The Haunted Hotel: A Mystery of Modern Venice and My Lady's Money

By Wilkie Collins | Go to book overview

my child--I wish to heaven you were going back to London with me! Well, Mr. Troy, how have you done with Miss Pink? Have you offended that terrible 'gentlewoman' (hateful word!); or has it been all the other way, and has she given you a kiss at parting?"

Mr. Troy smiled mysteriously, and changed the subject. His brief parting interview with the lady of the house was not of a nature to be rashly related. Miss Pink had not only positively assured him that her visitor was the most ill-bred woman she had ever met with, but had further accused Lady Lydiard of shaking her confidence in the aristocracy of her native country. "For the first time in my life," said Miss Pink, "I feel that something is to be said for the Republican point of view; and I am not indisposed to admit that the constitution of the United States has its advantages!"


CHAPTER XII

THE conference between Lady Lydiard and Mr. Troy, on the way back to London, led to some practical results.

Hearing from her legal adviser that the inquiry after the missing money was for a moment at a standstill, Lady Lydiard made one of those bold suggestions with which she was accustomed to startle her friends in cases of emergency. She had heard favorable reports of the extraordinary

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The Haunted Hotel: A Mystery of Modern Venice and My Lady's Money
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • List of Illustrations 4
  • Preface. 6
  • Chapter IV 33
  • The Second Part. 44
  • The Second Part. 44
  • The Second Part. 55
  • The Second Part. 66
  • The Second Part. 70
  • The Second Part. 83
  • The Second Part. 87
  • Chapter XI 94
  • The Second Part. 102
  • The Second Part. 114
  • The Second Part. 114
  • The Second Part. 123
  • Chapter Xv. (miss Agnes Lockwood to Mrs. Ferrari.) 130
  • The Fourth Part. Chapter Xvi. 136
  • Chapter XVII 139
  • Chapter XVII 150
  • Chapter XIX 156
  • Chapter XX 168
  • Chapter XX 180
  • Chapter XXII 190
  • Chapter XXIII 200
  • Chapter XXIII 210
  • Chapter XXIII 219
  • Chapter XXIII 229
  • Chapter XXIII 245
  • Chapter XXVIII 251
  • Postscript. 258
  • Persons of the Story 264
  • Postscript. 265
  • Postscript. 265
  • Postscript. 270
  • Postscript. 275
  • Postscript. 284
  • Postscript. 296
  • Postscript. 305
  • Postscript. 321
  • Postscript. 330
  • Postscript. 330
  • Chapter X 336
  • Chapter X 346
  • Chapter XI 359
  • Chapter X 374
  • Chapter XIII 385
  • Chapter XVI 412
  • Chapter XVI 425
  • Chapter XVI 430
  • Chapter XVI 434
  • Chapter XVI 453
  • Postscript. 474
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