Peter the Great: Emperor of All Russia

By Ian Grey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
The Fall of Sofia 1689

IN Moscow a period of frantic diplomatic and military activity followed on the failure of Golitsyn's Crimean expedition. The Polish campaign of 1687 against the Turks had also failed, but the Austrians and Venetians had won resounding victories, which had aroused in the Orthodox Christians of southern and eastern Europe new hopes of liberation. These Orthodox Christians now implored the Muscovites to renew their campaign and their prayers were urgent for, much as they hated the Turkish yoke, they dreaded far more the Roman Catholic persecution which would hound them if Austrians and Venetians rather than Muscovites were their liberators. But Muscovy was in no position to answer their pleas.

At this time Sofia and her government were chiefly concerned that their allies should not make a separate peace. Fear of this led Sofia to reduce all other commitments. Desperate appeals for reinforcements were then reaching Moscow from the small band of frontiermen in the Amur basin. The Russians, in their advance across Siberia to the Pacific Ocean, had reached the Amur River in 1643, where the might of China had halted them. For some thirty years they had been fighting to retain their foothold. But, instead of reinforcements, Sofia sent an embassy to make peace with the Chinese Emperor, and at Nerchinsk an agreement depriving Muscovy of the Amur basin was signed.

Meanwhile the Crimean Khan had renewed his raids. In the first three months of 1688, his Tatars had carried off sixty thousand pris-

-58-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Peter the Great: Emperor of All Russia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 505

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.