Peter the Great: Emperor of All Russia

By Ian Grey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXIV
Dorpat and Narva 1703-1704

THE capture of Yamburg and Koporie in the summer of 1703 had completed Russia's conquest of Ingria. Anticipating the cold weather, Sheremetev wrote to ask Peter where he should rest his troops and himself in winter quarters.1 But Peter did not think of rest. "When the town [the fortification of Yamburg] is finished, it would be better, if you set out on some campaign," he replied on 24 July 1703 from the Svir shipyards.2 On the same day he sent Menshikov to Yamburg to concert plans with Sheremetev. Three weeks later Sheremetev marched.3

The purpose of this expedition was to lay waste Esthonia and Livonia, and thus hinder any Swedish attempts to relieve the proposed seige of Dorpat and Narva in the summer of 1704. Sheremetev set out towards the end of August with twelve mounted regiments, and a collection of Cossacks, Bashkirs, Kalmyks, and Tatars. He crossed the Narova River and entered Wesenburg on 5 September. Within four days and nights his men had reduced the town to a vast mound of rubble. Meanwhile Schlippenbach had retreated to Reval, for with his small force, he could do nothing to stay the Russians in their fearful march. Sheremetev swept through Esthonia and Livonia scourging the land so terribly that only Reval, Pernau, Riga, Narva, and Dorpat, remained standing.

During the winter Peter gave Sheremetev orders to capture Dorpat in the spring,4 and by mid-July, Sheremetev's army of twenty-three thousand men with forty-six cannon had taken up positions before

-229-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Peter the Great: Emperor of All Russia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 505

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.