What Roosevelt Thought: The Social and Political Ideas of Franklin D. Roosevelt

By Thomas H. Greer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I WISH TO MAKE GRATEFUL ACKNOWLEDGMENT to all those who helped make my book possible. I am indebted to the staff of the Roosevelt Library, and especially to Herman Kahn, William Nichols, George Roach, Jerome Deyo, Raymond Corey, Gloria Golden, and Louise Evans.

Also, I wish to thank my colleague, Karl Thompson, who read and criticized the manuscript. Portions were also read by Harry Kimber, Edward Blackman, Walter Adams, and Werner Bohnstedt, all of whom gave helpful comments. I appreciate, too, the substantial aid of research grants by Michigan State University. Finally, I am grateful to my wife, Margarette M. Greer, for her steady encouragement and advice.

Herman Kahn, Director of the Roosevelt Library, has extended me permission to quote from the Roosevelt manuscripts there. All materials cited, unless otherwise indicated, are at Hyde Park. Roosevelt's speeches may be found there in typescript form, as well as in the published collections listed in my "Bibliographical Note." For permission to quote certain passages from their publications, I express appreciation to Harper & Brothers, The Macmillan Company, and Random House.

-vii-

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What Roosevelt Thought: The Social and Political Ideas of Franklin D. Roosevelt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface - Roosevelt: A Practical Philosopher ix
  • Contents xiii
  • 1 - Vision of the Abundant Life 3
  • 2 - Unto Unto Caesar What is Caesar's 26
  • 3 - Government and the Economy 45
  • 4 - A More Perfect Union: The American Constitutional System 75
  • 5 - The People's Choice: The Presidency 88
  • 6 - The Great Game of Politics 114
  • 7 - Truth and Citizenship 142
  • 8 - The Good Neighbor 158
  • 9 - Strategy for Survival 183
  • 10 - Roosevelt: Radical or Conservative? 206
  • Notes and Bibliography 215
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliographical Note 229
  • Index 235
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