What Roosevelt Thought: The Social and Political Ideas of Franklin D. Roosevelt

By Thomas H. Greer | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Note

To THE EVERLASTING CONVENIENCE OF SCHOLARS, the Roosevelt Papers are concentrated in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library at Hyde Park, New York. This is the largest collection of materials relating to one man to be found in the United States, and all but a small portion is open to examination. A few files are closed for reasons of national security; other restricted categories include reports of investigations of applicants for jobs, and materials relating to Roosevelt's personal finances. The size and range of the collection, and its availability to scholars so soon after the donor's death, are without precedent in American historiography.

The three principal file groups which were examined in the preparation of this book belong to the general section of "White House papers." The most useful one proved to be the "President's Personal File" (PPF), which is a collection of his private correspondence with individuals and organizations. It consists of more than 10,000 folders and boxes of letters. A much smaller group is the "President's Secretary's File" (PSF), containing letters of special importance which Roosevelt wished to keep separate. The largest of all the archive groups is the "Official File" (OF). These are papers which passed between the White House and the many agencies of government during his twelve years in the presidency. In all this correspondence, a high ratio of the content is routine; but

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What Roosevelt Thought: The Social and Political Ideas of Franklin D. Roosevelt
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface - Roosevelt: A Practical Philosopher ix
  • Contents xiii
  • 1 - Vision of the Abundant Life 3
  • 2 - Unto Unto Caesar What is Caesar's 26
  • 3 - Government and the Economy 45
  • 4 - A More Perfect Union: The American Constitutional System 75
  • 5 - The People's Choice: The Presidency 88
  • 6 - The Great Game of Politics 114
  • 7 - Truth and Citizenship 142
  • 8 - The Good Neighbor 158
  • 9 - Strategy for Survival 183
  • 10 - Roosevelt: Radical or Conservative? 206
  • Notes and Bibliography 215
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliographical Note 229
  • Index 235
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