Freedom of the Press and L'Association Mensuelle: Philipon Versus Louis-Philippe

By Edwin De T. Bechtel | Go to book overview

(6) MARTIGNAC'S SHORT-LIVED MINISTRY; REPEAL OF REPRESSION: 1828-1829

The Vicomte de Martignac who was named by the King to succeed Villéle had supported many of the obnoxious measures of his predecessor; as a member of the Council of State, he had helped to introduce the loi de tendance in 1822; he had defended the proposed press laws which were defeated in 1827; and he had not respected the Charte. Although Royer-Collard became the presiding officer of the Chamber of Deputies, and Guizot and other Doctrinaires were recalled, the appointment of a few liberal Royalists as Ministers meant little more than that the government was in trouble. Charles X, with design, referred to the "liberties created by the Charte" in his speech from the throne. But, when soon thereafter, on the demands of the Left and the Liberal Right, his Ministry approved the repeal of the press loi de tendance, preliminary authorization of newspapers and the abolition of censorship, the King criticized Martignac "for meeting the Revolution halfway."

Martignac also attempted to restrict the control of education. by the Jesuits, but enraged the Ultramontane Royalists. He disappointed the Liberals by not advocating a general revision of the education laws. Then he proposed to revise the electoral laws by increasing representation in the provincial assemblies, but not in the Chamber of Deputies. All the larger groups in both Chambers opposed him; and all legislation was blocked. These failures of parliamentary government angered the King, who said that he "would rather hew wood than be a King under the English system," and dismissed Martignac on August 9, 1829.


III
THE PRESS AND THE REVOLUTION OF 1830

(1) THE ORDINANCES OF CHARLES X AND THE PROTEST OF THE NEWSPAPERS: 1829-1830

CHARLES X called his favorite, the Prince de Polignac, to form a new Ministry. As an irreconcilable White Bourbon and émigré, he had refused to swear obedience to the Charte in 1815; he was an incompetent, irascible politician and a temperamental visionary. The King designated, as members of the Ministry, de Bourmont, who had been a traitor at Waterloo and would later take up arms against the July Monarchy, and La Bourdonnave, a White Terrorist. The other members of the cabinet were all ultrareactionaries of the old regime. This made disaster doubly sure.

The liberal newspaper, the Figaro, in mourning borders, announced the appointment of Polignac with a horoscope of his Ministry: it predicted calamity. Its editor urged that Paris houses be draped in black; that the fête of the King's birthday be cancelled; and that a well-known surgeon should remove the cataract from the eyes of "an august personage." The publisher of the newspaper was prosecuted for the crime d'outrage à la personne

-20-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Freedom of the Press and L'Association Mensuelle: Philipon Versus Louis-Philippe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 91

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.