Union in Peril: The Crisis over British Intervention in the Civil War

By Howard Jones | Go to book overview

5
Trials of British Neutrality

It is when the Americans feel sure of us that they take liberties.

-- Lord Lyons,

February 11, 1862

The Trent crisis had passed, but the Union government remained concerned about British recognition of the Confederacy. The war threat during the winter of 1861-62 had encouraged British observers to consider some action intended to bring the American conflict to a close before another confrontation--perhaps more dangerous--developed between the Atlantic nations. The Confederacy, many Englishmen continued to believe, had proved its mettle by routing the Union army at Bull Run. The Union owed it to humanity to let the Confederacy go in peace. Yet, as the British saw things, the Lincoln administration was unreasonable in expecting to force the South back into the fold. Even though the Palmerston ministry maintained its aloofness from the American conflict, British figures outside the center of power re-

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Union in Peril: The Crisis over British Intervention in the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Problems of Recognition 10
  • 2 - British Neutrality and the Rules of Modern Civilized Warfare 38
  • 3 - Bull Run and the Threat of Foreign Intervention 57
  • 4 - The Trent Affair and Recognition 80
  • 5 - Trials of British Neutrality 100
  • 6 - Seedtime of British Intervention 122
  • 7 - Emancipation by the Sword and the British Decision to Intervene 138
  • 8 - Antietam and the Move Toward Mediation 162
  • 9 - Prelude to Intervention 181
  • 10 - Denouement: The November Decision in London 198
  • Conclusion 224
  • Notes 231
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 289
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