Papers of Edward P. Costigan: Relating to the Progressive Movement in Colorado, 1902-1917

By Colin B. Goodykoontz | Go to book overview

VI
THE PROGRESSIVE PARTY ENDS--THE MOVEMENT CONTINUES

The failure of the Progressives at the polls in 1914, a much more discouraging defeat than that of 1912, raised definitely the question of the future of the party. Those who had joined the movement in the hope of political preferment abandoned the sinking ship, if they had not already fled when it began to list in the summer of 1914. Others who had been sincere in their progressiveness reached the conclusion that the two-party system was too well established in American political life to be displaced, and that there was little likelihood that the Progressive party would soon become one of the two major political groups; these naturally returned to the party to which they had previously given allegiance. There were still others, and Mr. Costigan was one of them, who kept up their interest in and enthusiasm for the Progressive party. He was one of the delegates to the Progressive National Convention in 1916. This convention nominated Theodore Roosevelt again for the presidency; but the Colonel refused to accept the nomination, knowing that the Progressives had no chance to win and fearing that a division of the forces opposed to Woodrow Wilson might again, as in 1912, result in a Democratic victory. Mr. Costigan, on the contrary, recognizing President Wilson's noteworthy record of achievement in his first term, supported him in his successful campaign for reelection. But it should be noted that it was as a Progressive and not as a Democrat that Mr. Costigan voted for Wilson in 1916. After Roosevelt declined their nomination, the Progressives named no other candidate; the party passed off the national political stage.1

____________________
1
The name appeared again the campaign of 1924 when La Follette ran for president with the endorsement of the Conference for Progressive Political Action. He had the support of many of the former Progressives as well as members

-318-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Papers of Edward P. Costigan: Relating to the Progressive Movement in Colorado, 1902-1917
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.