The Dutch Republic and American Independence

By Jan Willem Schulte Nordholt; Herbert H. Rowen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 19
America: An Example and a Friend But what is there to oblige a citizen of the United Provinces to consider Americans as friends of the Republic?

JOHN ADAMS

HE decade of the eighties in the eighteenth century may be considered the prelude to a new age in the Netherlands. With its unrest, its mutual struggle of Dutch against Dutch, its yearning for both a greater unity and a more genuine, if still far from complete, influence of the people upon the government, it forms the period during which the old order was attacked at its heart and the new sought to come into being. And the whole spectacle was in truth not a puppet play--on this Dutch historians are now virtually agreed--in the hands of managers in London, Paris, and Berlin. The thesis of the Dutch historian Colenbrander that Dutch weal and woe were determined abroad, and with it his contempt for the Dutch forefathers of the eighteenth century, has been overcome now. The Republic was not a province dominated by mighty neighbors; it was a country struggling for a new future and therefore open to what was happening in the world at the time. Put in other terms, the fate of the Dutch was decided not only by ministers of state; there was also a spiritual, national movement. It was bourgeois in character--could it have been otherwise?--and therefore ambiguous in its attitude toward the ideals of the age. The words that were used could mean many things, as was true wherever else the new ideas broke through, in America, for example.

Popular influence, equality, representation--all these fine words were spoken at the height of men's voices. But as the leading Dutch historian of this period, Dr. C. H. E. de Wit, has shown in his broad and thoughtful studies, we must listen carefully to who is actually doing the trumpeting. The same thing said by two different persons is not the same thing.

What is clear in any case is that the American influence upon the events of these years in the Netherlands was of fundamental importance. It is true that there was an old democratic tradition in the Dutch Republic,

-264-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dutch Republic and American Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 358

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.