Law and Regulation of Common Carriers in the Communications Industry

By Daniel L. Brenner | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B: COMMUNICATIONS ACT OF 1934

TITLE 47--TELEGRAPHS, TELEPHONES, AND RADIOTELEGRAPHS

§ 151. Purposes of Chapter; Federal Communications Commission Created
For the purpose of regulating interstate and foreign commerce in communication by wire and radio so as to make available, so far as possible, to all the people of the United States a rapid, efficient, Nation-wide, and world-wide wire and radio communication service with adequate facilities at reasonable charges, for the purpose of the national defense, for the purpose of promoting safety of life and property through the use of wire and radio communications, and for the purpose of securing a more effective execution of this policy by centralizing authority heretofore granted by law to several agencies and by granting additional authority with respect to interstate and foreign commerce in wire and radio communication, there is created a commission to be known as the "Federal Communications Commission", which shall be constituted as hereinafter provided, and which shall execute and enforce the provisions of this chapter.
§ 152. Application of Chapter
a. The provisions of this Act shall apply to all interstate and foreign communication by wire or radio and all interstate and foreign transmission of energy by radio, which originates and/or is received within the United States, and to all persons engaged within the United States in such communication or such transmission of energy by radio, and to the licensing and regulating of all radio stations as hereinafter provided; but it shall not apply to persons engaged in wire or radio communication or transmission in the Canal Zone, or to wire or radio communications or transmission wholly in the Canal Zone. The provisions of this Act shall apply with respect to cable service, to all persons engaged within the United States in providing such service, and to the facilities of cable operators which relate to such service, as provided in subchapter V-A.
b. Except as provided in section 223 through 227, inclusive and section 332, and subject to the provisions of section 301 and Title VI, nothing in this Act shall be construed to apply or to give the Commission jurisdiction with respect to (1) charges, classifications, practices, services, facilities, or regulations for or in connection with

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Law and Regulation of Common Carriers in the Communications Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Public Utility Theory 1
  • 2 - Title II Regulation 45
  • 3 - Federal/State Jurisdiction 63
  • 4 - Statutory Requirements: Just and Reasonable"; "Unreasonable Discrimination"" 79
  • 5 - Dominant/Nondominant Carriers; Forbearance 96
  • 6 - Price Caps 116
  • 7 - Divestiture of the Bell System 159
  • 8 - Line of Business Restrictions 168
  • 9 - The Local Exchange: Access and Competition 186
  • 11 - International Telecommunications 274
  • 12 - Privacy 283
  • 13 - Convergence 299
  • Appendix A: Telecommunications Glossary 311
  • Appendix B: Communications Act of 1934 317
  • About the Book and Author 348
  • Case Index (principal Cases) 349
  • Index 351
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