The Sonnets of William Alabaster

By William Alabaster; G. M. Story et al. | Go to book overview

GENERAL INTRODUCTION

I. Biographical Sketch

WILLIAM ALABASTER was born at Hadleigh, Suffolk, 27 January 1567/8, the eldest of six children. His family was of ancient Norman extraction, but in the sixteenth century most of its members were engaged in trade. For example, a cousin, Thomas Alabaster, was a well-known London merchant, and William's father, Roger, had retired to Hadleigh to set up as a clothier after unsuccessful ventures in the trade with Spain. The family was staunchly Protestant: William was related to the great East Anglian Puritans, the Winthrops, and to John Still, sometime Rector of Hadleigh, Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, and Bishop of Bath and Wells.1

John Still interested himself in his nephew, especially in his education. After some years at Westminster School, where, under Camden and Edward Grant, he laid the foundations of his considerable mastery of the classical languages, Alabaster was elected a Queen's Scholar to Trinity College, and proceeded there in 1584.2, He passed rapidly through the usual stages of an academic career at Trinity; at the same time he was active in Cambridge literary circles. Between 1588 and 1592 he produced two notable pieces of Latin poetry. First came Elisais, an unfinished, and still unprinted, epic on Queen Elizabeth ('Who liues that can match that heroick song?', wrote Spenser in Colin Clouts Come Home Againe), and next the sombre tragedy Roxana, which Dr. Johnson thought

____________________
1
These early surroundings are described briefly in the poet's autobiography (see 'References and Abbreviations'), and in a document printed by Foley, Records, i. 65-68. Additional information is found in the diary of his uncle, Adam Winthrop of Groton, Winthrop Papers, vol. i.
2
Trinity College, Cambridge, Admissions Book. Alabaster took his B.A. in 1587/8, was elected a Fellow in 1589, M.A., 1591.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sonnets of William Alabaster
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford English Monographs ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • References and Abbreviations ix
  • General Introduction xi
  • Textual Introduction xliv
  • Divine Meditations 1
  • The Portrait of Christ's Death 1
  • Penitential Sonnets 7
  • Resurrection 11
  • Upon the Ensigns of Christ's Crucifying 13
  • Miscellaneous Sonnets (i) 19
  • New Jerusalem 23
  • Personal Sonnets 26
  • The Incarnation 30
  • Miscellaneous Sonnets (2) 38
  • Doubtful Poems 43
  • Commentary 45
  • Appendix 63
  • Index of First LInes 64
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 70

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.