Augustine to Galileo: The History of Science, A.D. 400- 1650

By A. C. Crombie | Go to book overview

I
SCIENCE IN WESTERN CHRISTENDOM UNTIL THE 12TH CENTURY RENAISSANCE

'Our play leaps o'er the vaunt and firstlings
of these broils
Beginning in the middle'

( Troilus and Cressida)

THE CONTRAST BETWEEN THE scientific ideas of the Dark Ages and the early Middle Ages, that is from about the 5th to the early 12th century, and those of the later Middle Ages, can best be seen in a conversation which is supposed to have taken place between the widely travelled 12th-century scholar and cleric Adelard of Bath and his stay-at-home nephew. Adelard's contribution to the discussion introduces the newly-recovered ideas of the ancient Greeks and the Arabs; that of his nephew represents the traditional view of Greek ideas as they had been preserved in Western Christendom since the fall of the Roman Empire.

The conversation is recorded in Adelard Qæstiones Naturales, written, probably, after he had studied some Arabic science but before he had achieved the familiarity with it which is shown in his later translations, such as those of the Arabic text of Euclid Elements and the astronomical tables of al-Khwarizmi. The topics covered range from meteorology to the transmission of light and sound, from the growth of plants to the cause of the tears which the nephew shed for joy at the safe return of his uncle.

When not long ago, while Henry, son of William [ Henry I, 1100- 35], was on the throne, I returned to England after my long period of study abroad, it was very agreeable to meet my friends again. After we had met and made the usual enquiries about one

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Augustine to Galileo: The History of Science, A.D. 400- 1650
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.