Critical Issues in American Art: A Book of Readings

By Mary Ann Calo | Go to book overview
huffy tone the other day, 'Then this is woman apart from her relations to man?' I told him it was." Cassatt to Palmer, Oct. 11, 1892 (cited by Sweet, 131).
110.
S. Fillin-Yeh, "Mary Cassatt's Images of Women," Art Journal, XXXV, Summer 1976, 359-63; 361. Fillin-Yeh's remark is directed toward Cassatt's oeuvre as a whole.
111.
Cassatt to Palmer, Oct. 11, 1892 (cited by Sweet, 131). Her linkage of womanhood with childhood restates a commonplace of patriarchal thought. Moreover, as Ortner observes, "Mothers and their children, according to cultural reasoning, belong together," and "the sheer fact of constant association with children" bonds women to the realm of nature in a nature/culture dialectic (p. 77).
112.
Frances E. Willard was among those who voiced disapproval of Cassatt's omission of male figures; see Weimann, 314.
113.
Hale, 164.
114.
The text of Holt's address is transcribed in Eagle, 190-193; see 191. Holt also advocated enlightened collaboration between the genders in U.S. society; she closed her speech before the Women's Congress with the assertion that modern woman "believes in man and woman. She also believes in that land, on the hills of which walk brave women and brave men hand in hand" (p. 193).
115.
Holt in Eagle, 191-192, 190.
116.
Minnie D. Louis, in her speech to the Fair's Congress of Women, observed, for instance, that even "the veriest misogynist pictures his ideal of purity in female form"; see "Woman, the Inciter to Reform," in Eagle, 539-43, 542.

FREQUENTLY CITED SOURCES

R. Badger, The Great American Fair: The World's Columbian Exposition & American Culture, Chicago, 1979.

J. G. Blaine et al., Columbus and Columbia: A Pictorial History of the Man and the Nation, Springfield, Ohio, 1892.

D. F. Burg, Chicago's White City of 1893, Lexington, Kentucky, 1976.

C. L. Burnham, Sweet Clover: A Romance of the White City, Boston, 1894.

J. Connor and J. Rosenkrantz, Rediscoveries in American Sculpture, Austin, Texas, 1989.

J. Doenecke, "Myths, Machines and Markets: The Columbian Exposition of 1893," Journal of Popular Culture, winter 1972, pp. 535-49.

M. K.O. Eagle (ed.), The Congress of Women, New York, 1893.

Mrs. D. C. French, Memories of a Sculptor's Wife, Boston, 1928.

E. A. Gordon, Frederick Macmonnies, Mary Fairchild Macmonnies: Deux artistes américains à Giverny, Vernon, France, 1988.

N. Hale, Mary Cassatt, New York, 1975.

A. Leslie (pseud. for L. Buck), Amy Leslie at the Fair, Chicago, 1893.

N. M. Mathews, Mary Cassatt, New York, 1987.

G. Pollock, Mary Cassatt, London, 1980.

Quondam (C. M. Stevens), The Adventures of Uncle Jeremiah and Family at the Great Fair: Their Observations and Triumphs, Chicago, 1893.

C. Smith-Rosenberg, Disorderly Conduct: Visions of Gender in Victorian America, New York, 1985.

F. A. Sweet, Miss Mary Cassatt, Impressionist from Pennsylvania, Norman, Oklahoma, 1966.

A. Trachtenberg, The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age, New York, 1982.

Maj. B. C. Truman (ed.), History of the World's Fair, being a Complete Description of the World's Columbian Exposition from its Inception, Chicago, 1893.

S. Waller (ed.), Women Artists in the Modern Era: A Documentary History, London, 1991.

M. Weimann, The Fair Women, Chicago, 1981.

-242-

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