Critical Issues in American Art: A Book of Readings

By Mary Ann Calo | Go to book overview

About the Editor and Contributors

Mary Ann Calo is associate professor in the Department of Art and Art History at Colgate University. She is the author of Bernard Berenson and the Twentieth Century ( 1994).

Matthew Baigell, author of A Concise History of American Painting and Sculpture ( 1984, 1996) and the Dictionary of American Art ( 1979), holds the rank of Professor II in the Department of Art History at Rutgers University. He has published widely on various aspects of American art. His most recent books include Soviet Dissidents Artists: Interviews After Perestroika ( 1995) and Jewish-American Artists and the Holocaust ( 1997).

Sarah Burns, professor in the Hope School of Fine Arts at Indiana University, writes on nineteenth- century American art and culture. She is the author of Pastoral Inventions: Rural Life in Nineteenth-Century American Art and Culture ( 1989) and Inventing the Modern Artist: Art and Culture in Gilded Age America ( 1996).

Anna C. Chave is professor of the history of art at Queens College and The Graduate Center, C.U.N.Y. Among her numerous publications on twentieth- century art are Constantin Brancusi: Shifting the Basis of Art ( 1993) and Mark Rothko: Subjects in Abstraction ( 1989).

Wanda M. Corn, noted scholar of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American art, is professor of art history in the Art Department of Stanford University. Her study on American modernism during the interwar period will be published in 1998.

Erika L. Doss teaches art history at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is the author of Benton, Pollock, and the Politics of Modernism: From Regionalism to Abstract Expressionism ( 1991) and Spirit Poles and Flying Pigs: Public Art and Cultural Democracy in American Communities ( 1995).

Vivien Green Fryd is associate professor in the Department of Fine Arts at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of Art and Empire: The Politics of Ethnicity in the United States Capitol, 1815-1860 ( 1992).

Robert E. Haywood is assistant professor of modern and contemporary European and American art at the University of Notre Dame. He has published on Claes Oldenburg is currently at work on a book about Happenings in the 1960s.

Gail E. Husch, associate professor of art history at Goucher College, writes on nineteenth-century American genre, religious and historical imagery.

Elizabeth Johns is Silfen Term Professor of American Art History at the University of Pennsylvania. She is author of Thomas Eakins: The Heroism of Modern Life ( 1983) and American Genre Painting: The Politics of Everyday Life ( 1991), as well as numerous articles and exhibition catalog essays on American art.

Margaretta M. Lovell is associate professor of the history of art and co-director of American studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of A Visitable Past: Views of Venice by American Artists, 1860-1915 ( 1986) and other essays on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American art and material culture.

David M. Lubin, author of Picturing a Nation: Art and Social Change in Nineteenth-Century America

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