CHAPTER II
POLITICAL EFFORTS

IMMEDIATELY AFTER the triumph of the revolutionary movement of March 10, 1952, Constitutional Statutes were promulgated which revived, with slight changes, the Constitution of 1940. To assume Legislative functions there was created, as an urgent stopgap, a Consultive Council (Consejo Consultivo) of 80 members. This body began deliberations April 28, 1952, and ceased functioning January 27, 1955, when the elected Representatives and Senators took office. All sectors of national life were represented in the Council: The Presidents of the Associations of Sugar Mill and Sugar Plantation Owners (Asociaciones de Hacendados y Colonos); the Secretaries-General of the Cuban Labor Confederation (C.T.C.), of the National Federation of Sugar Workers (F.N.T.A.), and of other federations of workers; the glorious veterans of the War of Independence; lawyers, engineers, physicians, teachers, journalists, agrarian leaders, career politicians and ex-Congressmen, and social, economic and industrial technicians. This body considered 67 bills submitted by the Council of Ministers and 280 initiated by its own members. The Consultive Council was called to session 168 times, and only 10 times failed to deliberate for want of a quorum.

Outstanding among their decrees were those which created the Offices for Construction of Local Highways (Construcción de Caminos Vecinales) in each Municipal District; the Repair and Construction of Rural Housing ( Reparación y Construcción de Viviendas Campesinas) and Rehabilitation of Slum Areas ( Rehabilitacion de los Barrios de Indigentes) the Ad-

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