CHAPTER XXIX
ACCOMPLISHMENTS

THE ELECTION OF June 1, 1940, which I won, was open. All the legal safeguards were observed. Although my Administration was carried on under the enormous difficulties engendered by World War II, the political parties and the press enjoyed complete freedom. Income was poor, hardly covering a national budget of $85 million, but capital investment was stimulated, the national economy was sound and salaries were high. Labor and industry were not harassed and the Republic fulfilled its international obligations as a nation at war with the Rome-Berlin-Tokyo Axis.


Difficulties and the War

My Administration was faced with four years of constant internal threats as well as by espionage. We had to solve the problem of many important shortages, make up the deficit of a sharply reduced harvest, and create new sources of employment. At the beginning of February, the Chiefs of the 3 branches of the Armed Forces attempted a military coup against me on the pretext that a civil administration could not resolve the economic crisis.* On September 3, 1939, the British Empire had declared war in the face of the mounting Hitler aggression and the European power and part of Asia were involved in the fight. It seemed very probable that the conflict would extend to the American Continent and a network of Axis espionage devel-

____________________
*
See Chapter XXX.

-207-

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