Emotion and the Arts

By Mette Hjort; Sue Laver | Go to book overview

thereby affording us a better understanding of the relation between our emotions, beliefs, desires, and actions.


NOTES
1.
For an excellent account of the history of antitheatrical thinking, see Barish 1981.
2.
See Prynne [ 1633] 1972.
3.
See Nicole [ 1667] 1971. The Traité was first published in 1667 as part of Les Imaginaires ou lettres sur l'hérésie. See also the discussion of Prynne and Nicole in "The Theater of Emotions" in Hjort The Strategy of Letters ( 1993).
4.
See Diderot [ 1906] 1958.
5.
See Stanislavski 1936.
6.
See Brecht 1957, 87-90. For an illuminating discussion of Brechtian views of emotion, see Murray Smith 1996.
7.
The Theater and Its Double ( 1958).
8.
See his reference to the recto and verso of existence in The Theater and Its Double ( 1958).
9.
Emotion ( 1980), 25.
10.
See his Literary Knowledge: Humanistic Inquiry and the Philosophy of Science ( 1988), 233-34, 238-42.
11.
This point is made clearly by Gregory Currie, who characterizes his use of simulation theory as an attempt "to break out of the philosopher's ghetto within which the aesthetician so often finds herself imprisoned."
12.
See Lyons Emotion ( 1980), chap. 1 ( "Three classical theories of emotion: the feeling, behaviourist and psychoanalytic theories").
13.
Lyons, Emotion ( 1980), 33.
14.
See de Sousa The Rationality of Emotion ( 1987), Solomon The Passions ( 1976), and Lyons Emotion ( 1980).
15.
"An Outline of the Social Constructionist Viewpoint," in The Social Construction of Emotions ( 1986), edited by Rom Harré, 2-14, 9.
16.
See Catherine Lutz much cited "Need, Nurturance, and the Emotions on a Pacific Atoll" ( 1995).
17.
Harré 1986, 4.
18.
See Solomon "The Cross-Cultural Comparison of Emotion" ( 1995), 263.
19.
See Lyons's critique of the "three classical theories of emotion" and his account of the "causal-evaluative theory" in Emotion ( 1980).
20.
Harré 1986, 6.
21.
The Nature of Fiction ( 1990), 187. For other discussions of the paradox of fiction, see Charlton 1984; Walton 1978; Dammann 1992; Lamarque 1981; Yanal 1994; and Novitz 1980.
22.
See Reading with Feeling: The Aesthetics of Appreciation ( 1996), esp. 140-42.
23.
New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

-19-

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