3.
Campus Planning

PLANNING PROBLEMS
Statistical evidence can be likened to a telephone directory: there are lots of characters but little plot. Rather than beginning with tabular summaries, the following plot-like extracts of recent consultant commissions have been selected to indicate the scope of campus planning. These dramatic situations have been over-simplified, but they are representative of how physical planning today is expected to provide the context within which typical problems such as these can be resolved.
We are proud of our buildings. The unified style has made this campus an outstanding example of the architecture of the period. We have found, however, that the cost of construction and lack of craftsmanship have made it impossible for us to obtain in our new buildings the sensitive detailing which the older facilities have. We must soon build a new classroom building near Founders Hall, in the center of campus. Whatever its design it will be subject to much controversy among our alumni. We hope you will give this issue your full consideration in your review of the various proposals.
The Committee feels that somewhere within this 2000 acre campus there is a site for the Continuing Education building which is close to the student residence halls for summer programs, close to the town's motel district for winter programs, and at the same time advantageously related to the main auditorium.
The City Council has expressed great concern for what is happening along College Avenue. The parking spaces occupied by students force shoppers to the Uptown Plaza, and the storekeepers along the Avenue are demanding that the College do something about this situation.
The National Science Foundation will pay 90% of all costs for building the computer center. At the conclusion of the five year contract period this facility will be turned over to the school for whatever instructional purposes the school desires. The building location hence must serve the contract research area now, and still be sited close to the academic area for later use as a training tool.
We will try to house all our students on campus. Ten year enrollment projections indicate that the numbers to be accommodated will vary in sex (male or female) as much as 15% from year to year. What kind of accommodations should be built and where?
The memorial grove of trees and fountain should form a place of meditation and prayer, where students can pause for a moment of quiet contemplation. It should be as central as possible, yet not impinge on the highest use areas on campus.
The City's long-range plan has given full consideration to the growth pattern around the University, and it is our technical staff's opinion that the proposed highway interchange should be located on school land. We realize this has been preserved for future playfields for the college, but we see no alternative at this time.
The problem can be summarized thus: where is the best location in the state for a new campus for a 25,000 student university? We estimate a land requirement of 1200 contiguous acres. The plan must be staged to accommodate an additional 1500 students each year to the projected enrollment limit.
Our library is well located for serving both day and night student populations. We must, however, expand stack space and reading rooms 30% by 1965. What alternatives are available to us, both in terms of cost, site and library operation?
We are all sorry about this unfortunate stabbing. This office (City Manager) will take all steps to increase police protection in the vicinity of the College. We have also authorized a study of how street lighting can be improved. But as long as the intolerable slum- like conditions continue on the East Side, these incidents will continue. We would like your advice, then, as to whether or not recent Urban Renewal legislation might be applied here, as a joint town-gown planning effort.
How can we best site our new married student housing units? The only land available is a flat field, with no existing vegetation, and separated from the main campus by a major expressway.

-43-

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Campus Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents v
  • I. Prospectus 1
  • 1 - Outlook 3
  • 2 - Campus Design in Perspective 13
  • 3 - Campus Planning 43
  • Ii. the Campus and Its Parts 55
  • Footnotes 65
  • 3 - Libraries and Museums 85
  • 4 - Research 95
  • 5 - Centers of Extracurricular LIfe 101
  • 6 - Institutional Services 113
  • 7 - Housing 119
  • Footnotes 145
  • 8 - Sports, Recreation and Physical Education 147
  • 9 - Circulation and Parking 159
  • 10 - Utilities 166
  • Section III: Campus Plans 169
  • 1 - Expanding the Campus 171
  • 2 - Organizing for Planning 173
  • 3 - Survey and Analysis of Existing Conditions 183
  • 4 - Programming the Development Plan 199
  • Footnotes 208
  • 5 - Design in Planning 209
  • 6 - A Selection of Development Plans 239
  • 7 - Urban Renewal and Campus Expansion 275
  • 8 - New Campuses 287
  • Acknowledgments: 308
  • Index 308
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