5.
Centers of Extracurricular Life
Phi Kappa Hall ( 1836) University of Georgia PHOTO COURTESY OF LIBRARY OF CONCRESS

CENTERS OF EXTRACURRICULAR LIFE
There are special non-instructional buildings on campus, important to the life of the academic community, having special design requirements and necessitating a central location of public prominence. These buildings are the centers of extracurricular life. Typical examples include:
1. College and university unions
2. Faculty clubs
3. Chapels and churches
4. Auditoriums and theatres
In varying degrees these centers have existed in some form throughout the history of higher American education. Compulsory chapel attendance was an integral part of life at the denominational college. Theatre, debating societies and musicales date back to the 1750's. Surviving buildings are among the best examples of the architecture of their time, such as the Phi Kappa Literary Society Hall ( 1836) at the University of Georgia, and Eumaneant and Philanthropic Halls ( 1849) at Davidson College. While student unions as a building type are less than a hundred years old, the functions they shelter were carried on either outside the college or in makeshift quarters. As an historian of the 18th century college wrote, the "boys met in one another's rooms, read poems, held learned conversations, and enjoyed some tobacco and beer."Centers of extracurricular life tend to be memorial buildings constructed but once or twice a century. They usually represent considerable investment for special interior furnishings and equipment. Because of their specialized nature these buildings should be represented in the plan by modules based on preliminary architectural programs. Where such a program cannot be prepared, a squarefootage-standard-per-user can help measure an appropriate module. At best such square footage standards are only approximations which will ensure the reservation of an adequate site, but not much more than that. However, once a reasonable site has been selected, then at least land use and circulations decisions can be made.
COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY UNIONS
If libraries are the temples of learning, then student unions are the agorae and forums. Campus unions today serve the following functions:
1. The sale of goods and services, either as a convenience to the campus community or as a necessity (when the campus is too remote from local shopping centers).
2. Provision of facilities for supervised social activities and indoor recreation.
3. Provision of facilities for extra-curricular student activities and organizations, such as student publications, hobby groups, and political clubs.
4. On some campuses the student union may serve as the central dining hall, achieving economies by combining several kinds of food operations under one roof, particularly when there is insufficient volume to support or warrant such functions individually.
5. On the denominational campuses, because they are centrally located facilities, student unions are also convenient places for chapels, which are sometimes constructed as a wing to the student union.

The offices of the deans of men and women can be advantageously located in the student union, close to the pulse of student life. Institutions with large enrollments may have several buildings devoted to the purposes which are embodied in a single building on a smaller campus.

The following individual activities were identified in twenty student union buildings constructed since 1950.

alumni offices
art display areas
administrative offices
ballrooms
banquet rooms
barber shops
bookstores
bowling alleys
cafeterias
chapels
cigar and cigarette
vendors stands
co-operative stores
dining rooms
faculty lounges
game rooms

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Campus Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents v
  • I. Prospectus 1
  • 1 - Outlook 3
  • 2 - Campus Design in Perspective 13
  • 3 - Campus Planning 43
  • Ii. the Campus and Its Parts 55
  • Footnotes 65
  • 3 - Libraries and Museums 85
  • 4 - Research 95
  • 5 - Centers of Extracurricular LIfe 101
  • 6 - Institutional Services 113
  • 7 - Housing 119
  • Footnotes 145
  • 8 - Sports, Recreation and Physical Education 147
  • 9 - Circulation and Parking 159
  • 10 - Utilities 166
  • Section III: Campus Plans 169
  • 1 - Expanding the Campus 171
  • 2 - Organizing for Planning 173
  • 3 - Survey and Analysis of Existing Conditions 183
  • 4 - Programming the Development Plan 199
  • Footnotes 208
  • 5 - Design in Planning 209
  • 6 - A Selection of Development Plans 239
  • 7 - Urban Renewal and Campus Expansion 275
  • 8 - New Campuses 287
  • Acknowledgments: 308
  • Index 308
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.