7.
Housing
1A San Francisco Theological Seminary, Residence Halls Architect: John Carl Warnecke ( 1959) PHOTO BY DANDELET
1B Sweet Briar College William B. Dew Hall ( 1956) PHOTO BY BOB FLOURNOY
2 Coeducational Housing (1959) University of California, Los Angeles Architects: Welton Becket & Associates Landscape Architect: Ralph Cornell Right wing is for male students, left for female. Ground floor shelters commons, playrooms, and administrative offices. Affectionately called the "Westwood-Hilton" by the student body.
3 Birch Hall, Antioch College (1949) Saarinen and Swanson & Associates Max G. Mercer, Associated Architect
Not all colleges and universities have residential facilities. Among these institutions which do provide housing, the quality and quantity of construction and housing policies are as diverse and varied as are the concepts of American higher education itself.
Trends
In volume housing represents the largest single capital investment among various types of buildings on campus. Though not all institutions provide campus housing half the total of college and university buildings are devoted to this use. Housing policies and building types are as diverse as higher education itself. The central issues are not just those of quantity and quality; for the basic question as to whether or not institutions have an obligation to provide housing as part of their academic purpose is still debated, as it has been continuously for the last three hundred years. Among the colleges and universities furnishing housing, the major trends are:
1. Expansion of the institution's role in housing to encompass all segments of the campus population, including graduate students, married students, faculty and staff, as well as the undergraduate body.
2. Diversity in types of accommodations on campus, including high-rise facilities, "villages'' for married students; the mixture of male and female students on one site; cooperative housekeeping units; the enrichment of the undergraduate housing environment through the addition of interior commons rooms, dining facilities; sophisticated programming techniques for deciding the number of students to be accommodated on each floor, in each unit, and in each housing group. Greater attention is also being paid to the location of housing in relationship to playfield and recreation areas, the campus libraries and other common facilities. On the larger campuses, housing units are now being scattered, rather than concentrated in one area as they were in the past.
3. The operation of student housing as an income producing venture.
4. Participation by the institution in the quality of off-campus housing through direct participation in urban renewal, the policing and inspection of such units not owned by the university, the provision of low interest loans for off-campus construction, and occasionally the construction of off-campus housing itself.

While housing goals expand to include married students, faculty, and staff, the total percentage of students living on campus may drop in the next decade, barring a reversal of the present trends. The paradox is due in part to the scheduled construction and expansion of public institutions of higher education without housing accommodations. The location of new public institutions in California, Illinois, Florida, Massachusetts and other states is predicated on a site selection policy that places campuses within reasonable commuting distance of the greatest number of students. Two reasons are given for this policy. The cost of education to the individual or family is reduced if students can live at home. There is a trend towards larger families and a social acceptance of some form of higher education for all. With increased tuition costs and more children per family to educate, the establishment of the commuter campus thus seems reasonable as an economic arrangement. Commuting may reduce the cost of public education to the tax payer, as it is widely held, though not proven, that housing operations are not profitable.

-119-

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Campus Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents v
  • I. Prospectus 1
  • 1 - Outlook 3
  • 2 - Campus Design in Perspective 13
  • 3 - Campus Planning 43
  • Ii. the Campus and Its Parts 55
  • Footnotes 65
  • 3 - Libraries and Museums 85
  • 4 - Research 95
  • 5 - Centers of Extracurricular LIfe 101
  • 6 - Institutional Services 113
  • 7 - Housing 119
  • Footnotes 145
  • 8 - Sports, Recreation and Physical Education 147
  • 9 - Circulation and Parking 159
  • 10 - Utilities 166
  • Section III: Campus Plans 169
  • 1 - Expanding the Campus 171
  • 2 - Organizing for Planning 173
  • 3 - Survey and Analysis of Existing Conditions 183
  • 4 - Programming the Development Plan 199
  • Footnotes 208
  • 5 - Design in Planning 209
  • 6 - A Selection of Development Plans 239
  • 7 - Urban Renewal and Campus Expansion 275
  • 8 - New Campuses 287
  • Acknowledgments: 308
  • Index 308
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