9.
Circulation and Parking

THE RELATIONSHIP OF AUTOMOTIVE CIRCULATION AND PARKING TO THE CAMPUS PLAN

In evaluating circulation and parking on campus, one must first examine the overall transportation and circulation system off campus. With the exception of a dozen or so urban campuses located near the heart of the core cities, most campuses lie along those lines of regional communication which are presently weakest in supporting mass transportation. Unless there are steady improvements made in mass transit, or a technological innovation replacing the private car, or a change in personal tastes among choices of available transportation, the automobile will continue to be the prime carrier to and from campus. Within this context, parking is at one end of a list of physical planning considerations and regional highways at the other.

Properly handled, the automobile is not an impediment to creating a well designed campus plan. Nor is its use inconsonant with the goals of higher education.

The automobile made it possible to consolidate rural and suburban elementary and high schools in the early 1920's. This resulted in enlarged curriculums, better teaching, more efficient administration, and at lower costs.1 A similar effect may be observed during the next decade among the new highway- oriented colleges and universities. "Drive-in" campuses are being planned in southern Illinois, California, and Texas predicated on the belief that a high percentage of the student body will commute by private vehicle.

Where one parking space per four students is an accepted programming norm for development plans, these "rubber-tire schools" are planning almost a one-to-one parking ratio. Politics and economy, rather than convenience to the automobile owner lie behind these measures; politics because individual states are committed to providing higher education for all, economy because a commuting college or university education is relatively inexpensive for the student. The difference between the price of education on a "drive-in" campus compared to that of a residential campus can amount to $1,000 a year, which is the average cost for campus room and board. Commuting expenses should be a third of that, even lower if mass transit is used.

Commuting colleges have a higher student-teacher ratio than residential colleges. Commuting students use campus facilities less intensively than residential students. The operating charges to the individual and for the institution are accordingly that much less.

Earlier discussions of housing issues emphasized the advantages of a residential education. To balance accounts, the potential strengths of commuting campuses deserve mention. By coordinating new campus locations with highway planning, unusual educational diversity may be engendered. If several schools are equally accessible, the time-distance and locational factors can be exploited. Rather than many schools striving to gain self- sufficiency in all aspects, co-operative educational programs could be established; and each school could contribute from its own best resources. Typical joint ventures might include: sharing of expensive research tools, such as a computing center; cross-registrations in courses having low enrollments; library exchange privileges.

To some extent this opportunity is already being exploited along the Atlantic seaboard in what Joshua Fishman sees as a contemporary version of the medieval university --itinerant scholars and wandering students, all traveling a scholastic circuit from place to place. Cedar Crest, Lafayette, Moravian, Muhlenburg, and Lehigh in eastern Pennsylvvania; Amherst, University of Massachusetts, Williams, Smith and Mt. Holyoke in central Massachusetts have inter-institutional exchange programs in their respective regions. Such cooperative efforts by-pass the problem of great ambitions and little resources, which have been likened to "attempts by the Malay Federation to produce typewriters and TV sets while the United States struggles to produce synthetic rubber."2

Regional highways have strong, direct and immediate impact on campus planning. For example, if highway improvements in Rhode Island are accomplished as scheduled, the major connections between the state university and the regional road network will lie to the north of the University of Rhode Island campus, not to the south, as presently located. This means that within ten years the logical front door of the campus will spin 180 degrees. The University's development plan allows for this change by phasing construction so that the opening of the new highway and the University's north campus development will occur conjunctively.3

In Boulder, Colorado, the terminus of the Denver Turnpike ends near the University of Colorado campus at a critical intersection for city and campus traffic movements. The university's best use of land is temporarily aborted, pending a decision on how to relocate a crosstown road that carries traffic to

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Campus Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents v
  • I. Prospectus 1
  • 1 - Outlook 3
  • 2 - Campus Design in Perspective 13
  • 3 - Campus Planning 43
  • Ii. the Campus and Its Parts 55
  • Footnotes 65
  • 3 - Libraries and Museums 85
  • 4 - Research 95
  • 5 - Centers of Extracurricular LIfe 101
  • 6 - Institutional Services 113
  • 7 - Housing 119
  • Footnotes 145
  • 8 - Sports, Recreation and Physical Education 147
  • 9 - Circulation and Parking 159
  • 10 - Utilities 166
  • Section III: Campus Plans 169
  • 1 - Expanding the Campus 171
  • 2 - Organizing for Planning 173
  • 3 - Survey and Analysis of Existing Conditions 183
  • 4 - Programming the Development Plan 199
  • Footnotes 208
  • 5 - Design in Planning 209
  • 6 - A Selection of Development Plans 239
  • 7 - Urban Renewal and Campus Expansion 275
  • 8 - New Campuses 287
  • Acknowledgments: 308
  • Index 308
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.