2.
Organizing for Planning

ORGANIZING FOR PLANNING
To state that planning should be planned may seem redundant, yet process and procedure to a large extent control ultimate results. The manner in which planning is organized will depend upon the size of the school, the degree of experience which members of the institution have in such matters, the budget allocated for it, the amount of control exercised by the chief administrative officer and the general purposes of the plan.In suggesting what must be done in terms of general principles, due weight must be given to the exceptions. Occasionally, abbreviated expenditures of energy, time, and money for preliminary planning studies give satisfactory answers where a full commitment may be impossible or unnecessary. The following are some common situations:
1. Fund-raising activities. Institutions launching fund-raising campaigns find it difficult to allocate money for planning studies, even though some concept of the future development is necessary to create an image of what that future might be. A modest investment in planning studies, however, can help establish a reasonable program for development, identify in a general way the critical problems at issue, and justify the institution's approach to their solution. Preliminary planning will establish a basis for illustrating future solutions sounder than simple artistic license. The success of the fund drive may determine the amount of construction, so the program for development need not be detailed. Fund raisers believe that preliminary planning of this kind gains the respect of potential donors who feel secure that reasonable thought has been given to development problems and priorities for growth. This type of plan should never be promoted as the final solution.
2. Pilot planning studies. To test what has to be done to prepare a development plan, a "dry-run" can be organized. By using reasonable assumptions rather than facts, a synthetic plan may be produced which will be useful in pinpointing special problems, as well as in identifying gaps in data. As noted earlier pilot plans can serve as background context for making decisions that cannot be postponed until the final development plan has been completed.
3. Site accommodation studies. Pressed for time and with no overall plans available, decisions can be made on building sites, for example, by preparing a series of alternative sketch plans for future development. These should range from utopian to fairly conservative estimates for development patterns. Through comparisons, major planning factors may be isolated and a reasonable guess established as to an appropriate solution for the problem under review.

To be useful, site accommodation studies require full mobilization of the institution's resources for an intensive study period. Such studies are expensive and disruptive to the daily routine, though cheaper than preparing a development or pilot plan. They are best reserved for emergency situations.

-173-

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Campus Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents v
  • I. Prospectus 1
  • 1 - Outlook 3
  • 2 - Campus Design in Perspective 13
  • 3 - Campus Planning 43
  • Ii. the Campus and Its Parts 55
  • Footnotes 65
  • 3 - Libraries and Museums 85
  • 4 - Research 95
  • 5 - Centers of Extracurricular LIfe 101
  • 6 - Institutional Services 113
  • 7 - Housing 119
  • Footnotes 145
  • 8 - Sports, Recreation and Physical Education 147
  • 9 - Circulation and Parking 159
  • 10 - Utilities 166
  • Section III: Campus Plans 169
  • 1 - Expanding the Campus 171
  • 2 - Organizing for Planning 173
  • 3 - Survey and Analysis of Existing Conditions 183
  • 4 - Programming the Development Plan 199
  • Footnotes 208
  • 5 - Design in Planning 209
  • 6 - A Selection of Development Plans 239
  • 7 - Urban Renewal and Campus Expansion 275
  • 8 - New Campuses 287
  • Acknowledgments: 308
  • Index 308
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