4.
Programming the Development Plan

PROGRAMMING THE DEVELOPMENT PLAN
Programs have been described previously as policy and criteria -- a set of directions for making the plan. Programs for the development plan focus on estimating physical plant requirements for some point in the future. It may be a moment in time such as The 1975 Plan, or a projected enrollment such as 3,000 F.T.E. Plan. Whether it be the initial measurement of the planning task or the final summation that accompanies the plan, a program may be considered adequate if it includes these considerations:
1. Educational policies. A summation of educational goals and objectives, called the academic plan.
2. Projections. Here, two kinds of information are needed--demographic and physical plant. Demographic projections include a description of campus population--i.e., the number and characteristics of students, faculty, staff and other personnel expected to be accommodated by the development plan. Physical plant projections indicate the probable physical plant requirements for the projected population.
3. Planning and design criteria. The standards, fixed conditions, or requirements that must be met in the development plan. The various program and planning indices listed in Section II are typical.
4. Planning policies. These are the general guidelines for development which are not so easily expressed as mathematical formulae or in statistical summaries. Also included in this portion of programming are matters such as target dates, desired positional arrangements of campus land uses; policy positions on special matters uncovered in the survey and analysis stage; and statements regarding any other issues on which the institution wishes to take a clear position.
5. Improvement schedule. A priority listing of specific physical improvements. In the final program document, the schedule might be accompanied by a brief description of each suggested change or addition to the campus, the costs involved, and perhaps an illustration of the improvement, itself.

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Campus Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents v
  • I. Prospectus 1
  • 1 - Outlook 3
  • 2 - Campus Design in Perspective 13
  • 3 - Campus Planning 43
  • Ii. the Campus and Its Parts 55
  • Footnotes 65
  • 3 - Libraries and Museums 85
  • 4 - Research 95
  • 5 - Centers of Extracurricular LIfe 101
  • 6 - Institutional Services 113
  • 7 - Housing 119
  • Footnotes 145
  • 8 - Sports, Recreation and Physical Education 147
  • 9 - Circulation and Parking 159
  • 10 - Utilities 166
  • Section III: Campus Plans 169
  • 1 - Expanding the Campus 171
  • 2 - Organizing for Planning 173
  • 3 - Survey and Analysis of Existing Conditions 183
  • 4 - Programming the Development Plan 199
  • Footnotes 208
  • 5 - Design in Planning 209
  • 6 - A Selection of Development Plans 239
  • 7 - Urban Renewal and Campus Expansion 275
  • 8 - New Campuses 287
  • Acknowledgments: 308
  • Index 308
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