5.
Design in Planning

DESIGN IN PLANNING

Design in campus planning centers around two sets of speculation: the question of appropriate style and the search for campus form. Those issues of form and style which relate to the overall campus design are problems of structure; those aspects which are typically matters of detail are problems of content; that is to say, the first is skeleton, and the second is flesh. As this book focuses on the overall campus design, rather than the detailing of architecture and landscape, structure is emphasized as a design problem.

Structure is the overall unity brought about through long-range planning. To provide a design structure for the campus the individual parts of the campus are first given internal consistency in accordance with their program requirements. Then the various parts are combined so that the collective identity is easily recognized as being a campus.

Content is largely a matter of project planning and project design. There are, however, functional goals common to the design of both structure and content-for example, convenience and communication, flexibility and amenity.

This chapter describes how structure is established in campus design; how some of the functional goals are satisfied by the arrangement of land uses, by formal architectural composition, or by open-space planning. Techniques for reinforcing structure will be discussed; i.e., the solutions to design transition--methods for adding new elements to old campuses so that structure may be retained or reconstituted.

1 Oxford University (1958)
2 Foothill College, Los Altos Hills, California (1960) Ernest J. Kump, Masten and Hurd, Associated Architects Sasaki, Walker & Associates, Inc., Landscape Architects PHOTO BY: CARL H. RIEK

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Campus Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents v
  • I. Prospectus 1
  • 1 - Outlook 3
  • 2 - Campus Design in Perspective 13
  • 3 - Campus Planning 43
  • Ii. the Campus and Its Parts 55
  • Footnotes 65
  • 3 - Libraries and Museums 85
  • 4 - Research 95
  • 5 - Centers of Extracurricular LIfe 101
  • 6 - Institutional Services 113
  • 7 - Housing 119
  • Footnotes 145
  • 8 - Sports, Recreation and Physical Education 147
  • 9 - Circulation and Parking 159
  • 10 - Utilities 166
  • Section III: Campus Plans 169
  • 1 - Expanding the Campus 171
  • 2 - Organizing for Planning 173
  • 3 - Survey and Analysis of Existing Conditions 183
  • 4 - Programming the Development Plan 199
  • Footnotes 208
  • 5 - Design in Planning 209
  • 6 - A Selection of Development Plans 239
  • 7 - Urban Renewal and Campus Expansion 275
  • 8 - New Campuses 287
  • Acknowledgments: 308
  • Index 308
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