Globe and Hemisphere: Latin America's Place in the Postwar Foreign Relations of the United States

By J. Fred Rippy | Go to book overview

Preface

THIS SMALL VOLUME seeks to present in a global setting the main aspects of inter-American relations during the first decade following World War II. Because I felt that I had nothing of importance to add to what journalists, commentators, and compilers have said on purely political, diplomatic, and military subjects, I have given very little attention to these. The polarization of the globe by Soviet aggressive tendencies and efforts of the United States to combat them; the verbal encounters that characterized international conferences and the proceedings of the United Nations; the Rio de Janeiro Security Pact and its political and military implementation; NATO, SEATO, and the Baghdad Pact; the revolt against colonialism; the troubles and tragedies of Iran, Indonesia, Korea, and Indochina; the baffling political problems arising from the establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine and the dispute regarding the control of Suez; the sadistic Soviet repression of the Russian satellites -- familiarity with all these and the involvement of the United States in connection with them I have taken for granted. They are much-discussed topics concerning which I have nothing of significance to contribute. If any mysteries still cluster about them, they have not been revealed to me, nor are they likely to be disclosed before the present generation is replaced by another.

The emphasis that I have given to economic relations also arises from the fact that economic relations actually received major stress during the period. If the subject has been overindulged, the governments of the Americas and the world are to blame rather than this writer, who does not ignore the significance of intellectual association and emotional communion but merely follows what seems to be the trend of the times. Probably nowhere in the Americas or elsewhere this side of the

-ix-

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