The Origin and Development of Scholarly Historical Periodicals

By Margaret F. Stieg | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Like most published research, this book has had a long gestation period. Over the years, many debts have been incurred that it is now a pleasure to acknowledge. The idea itself I owe to Professor Abra- ham Bookstein, of the Graduate Library School, University of Chi- cago. I have known him and his wife, Marguerite, since our graduate student days at Berkeley. One evening the three of us were discussing research possibilities in librarianship and how to combine advanced work in a subject discipline with a career in library education. Abe suggested that I might look into scholarly communication among historians. I did, found it interesting, and this book is the result.

The broad scope of the research took me to archives throughout Western Europe 0and the United States. I benefited from the careful collecting, organizing, and describing of generations of archivists; without their efforts it would have been impossible to complete this study. Several cheerfully went to considerable trouble to facilitate my access to their collections. In Tübingen, the director of the J. C. B. Mohr (Paul Siebeck) firm, Georg Siebeck, kindly opened to me its records, a truly impressive collection, and provided me with working space and support.

The cooperation of a number of people who are associated with the different scholarly historical periodicals that are presently being pub- lished made it possible to make this account reasonably current. I am very grateful to those who were willing to take the time to speak with me. Their friendliness and cordiality were welcome during the soli- tary round of research. Martha Vicinus graciously extended to me the hospitality of her home while I was in Bloomington.

I would also like to thank those who wrote to me or made available records in their possession. Professor Eric Hobsbawm, of the Univer- sity of London, wrote a particularly informative letter about the early days of Rast and Present. Professor Edwin Davis, of Louisiana State University, made available his collection of materials on the Journal of Southern History. The papers of R. W. Seton-Watson were indispens- able to the chapter on interdisciplinary periodicals. They are in the possession of his sons, Professor G. H. N. Seton-Watson and Dr.

-ix-

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