The Origin and Development of Scholarly Historical Periodicals

By Margaret F. Stieg | Go to book overview

THREE THE SPREAD OF SCHOLARLY HISTORICAL PERIODICALS FRANCE, GREAT BRITAIN, AND THE UNITED STATES

The Founding of the Revue Historique, the English Historical Review, and the American Historical Review

The HZ did not long remain splendidly alone, but was soon joined by scholarly historical periodicals in other countries, most of which bore a strong family resemblance to it. It provided encouragement to the founders of these newcomers by its success and furnished them with a model. The diffusion of scholarly historical periodicals was a critical step in the growth of historical scholarship.

The first of these post-HZ journals appeared in France when Gabriel Monod founded the Revue historique (RH) in 1876. A medium for the publication of what he called "scientific history" and a source of information about the progress of historical scholarship in France and other countries, 1 the RH also had a political purpose. Monod hoped it would help to "provide our country with the moral unity and vigor it needs, enabling it both to become familiar with its historical traditions and to comprehend the transformations it has undergone." 2 Historical study was important to the nation, and the RH would be the means to promote it. This agenda limited the scope of the journal to European history and in particular to France.

The introduction to the English Historical Review (EHR), begun in 1886, does not state its plans so clearly. It does, by implication, say that the EHR was being founded to advance the common objectives of English historians. Nowhere are these defined, a reflection of the failure of English historians to articulate clearly their philosophy of history. The introduction does recognize a limited communications

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