Nuclear America: Military and Civilian Nuclear Power in the United States, 1940-1980

By Gerard H. Clarfield; William M. Wiecek | Go to book overview

Notes

Prologue: The Italian Navigator
1.
Arthur H. Compton, Atomic Quest: A Personal Narrative ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1956), p. 144.
2.
A 1933 speech to the British Association for the Advancement of Science, quoted in Ronald W. Clark, The Greatest Power on Earth: The International Race for Nuclear Supremacy ( New York: Harper & Row, 1980), p. 33. It is unclear whether the word "moonshine" appeared in the speech Rutherford actually gave or whether it was an interpolation by the London Times. In any event, the word caught the popular imagination so forcefully that the speech is still known as the "moonshine speech."
3.
Compton, Atomic Quest, p. 138.
4.
Richard G. Hewlett and Oscar E. Anderson Jr., The New World, 1939/1946, vol. I of A History of the United States Atomic Energy Commission ( University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1962), p. 109.
5.
A good journalistic account of December 2, 1942, is Stephane Groueff, Manhattan Project: The United Story of the Making of the Atomic Bomb ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1967), pp. 82-89.

1 E = mc2
1.
H. G. Wells, The World Set Free And Other War Papers, vol. XXI of The Works of R. G. Wells ( New York: Scribner's, 1926), pp. 23-25.
2.
Qpoted in Clark, The Greatest Power on Earth, pp. 6-7.
3.
Ibid., p. 24.
4.
Aston quoted in ibid., p. 24; A. S. Eve, Rutherford: Being the Life and Letters of the Rt. Hon. Lord Rutherford ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1939), p. 102.

-479-

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