The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935

By James D. Anderson | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
BLACK EDUCATION IN SOUTHERN HISTORY

THE EDUCATIONAL sphere in the postbellum South was, among other things, an ideological medium through which northerners and southerners posed and apprehended fundamental questions of class, culture, race, and democracy. Black education was one of the central arenas for that struggle to define social reality and shape the future direction of southern society. Without question, it was not as important as economics or politics, but, perhaps, it was a better lens through which to comprehend the separate and distinct social visions of a New South. For it was through differing forms of training the young that each class and race tried to shape its own future and translate its particular experiences, ideas, values, and norms into a legitimate projection of broader social relations. Inherent in the idea of universal education was the opportunity to engage in long-term, systemic, public discourse to make particular forms of experience and projections of social life dominant. The postbellum crusade for control over the educational process was indissolubly linked to the struggle to weld the separate elements of southern life into a single vision of the South's future. Hence not only questions involving the status and future of black southerners but also those involving relations among classes of northern and southern whites were drawn into the arena of black education.

Because each group believed that it was critical to educate the young in the values, norms, perceptions, sentiments, and customs that supported and defined the emergent New South, campaigns to control education often revealed complexities and differences that were less conspicuous in other areas. For instance, whites all over the South and many in the North supported efforts to disfranchise black voters. White consensus in these campaigns suggests a unity of belief in white supremacy that combined different classes of whites into a single ideology. The educational arena, however, revealed important ideological differences based on the social position, cultural beliefs, political strategies, and perceived common interests of their proponents. White planters who dominated local governments in the rural South generally resisted universal public education, particularly when it applied to rural blacks. White urban industrialists believed that blacks should be disfranchised and remain permanently

-279-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Education of Blacks in the South, 1860-1935
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.