The Rise of a New Federalism: Federal-State Cooperation in the United States

By Jane Perry Clark | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
Introduction

DISCUSSIONS of "centralization" and "states' rights" have long been the commonplaces of the hustings and the market place. From the early days of the American union the controversy has raged over the respective spheres of the federal and of state governments, and has tended to obscure other important issues of government in relation to the economic life of the day. As early as the 1830's De Tocqueville noticed that "centralization is become a word of general and daily use without any precise meaning being attached to it" and that there was "no surer means of courting the majority than by inveighing against the encroachments of the central power."1 As late as the economic crisis of the 1930's, the same garb of "states' rights" was refurbished in accordance with the pattern of the changed times, becoming the cloak of those who were opposed to any governmental regulation of business and industry and of those who, fearing the "curse of bigness" in government, in all honesty considered the states alone competent to regulate the destinies of their inhabitants. There comes to mind a saying of Benjamin Franklin: "Every Body cries, a Union is absolutely necessary; but when they come to the Manner and Form of the Union, their weak Noddles are perfectly distracted."2 The noddles of the wise as well as the weak have been sorely puzzled by the manner and form of the respective spheres of federal and state activity and of the relations between the two governments.3

It has become increasingly clear that many of the controversies

____________________
1
Democracy in America ( Reeve translation of 1900), Vol. I, pp. 89, 110.
2
Franklin, Writings, ed. by A. H. Smyth ( 1906), Vol. III, p. 242.
3
The use of the word "government" throughout the discussion is in a certain sense an over-simplification, for there is a nexus of different governmental interests in both the federal and state "governments" rather than two unified and opposing units. There may be many different and even conflicting interests within one "government," as, for example, when the legislative and executive branches of either are in conflict, or are of opposing political factions.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of a New Federalism: Federal-State Cooperation in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.