Riveting and Rationing in Dixie: Alabama Women and the Second World War

By Mary Martha Thomas | Go to book overview

Essay on

Sources

The major manuscript sources used in this study were U.S. government records, most of which are located in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Because Mobile was one of the ten most congested areas during the war, many government records dealt specifically with the city as well as the state. The most useful government records were those relating to the Bureau of Employment Security, Women's Bureau, War Manpower Commission, Committee for Congested Production Areas, Bureau of the Census, Office of War Information, Office of Community War Services, and Committee on Post-War Employment Problems. The records of the President's Fair Employment Practices Committee, located in the Atlanta branch of the National Archives, were a valuable source of information on black women's experience.

Manuscripts pertaining to the history of the state of Alabama are located at the Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, the City of Mobile Museum, the Mobile Municipal Archives, the Mobile Public Library, and the Department of Archives of the Birmingham Public Library. Among the most useful sources in the State Department of Archives was Alabama Social Welfare, a journal published by the State Department of Public Welfare during the 1930s and 1940s. Also in the archives is Home Front, a monthly bulletin of the Alabama State Defense Council; "Defense Developments in Alabama," a manuscript of the Department of Public Welfare; and the papers of the wartime governors, Chauncey Sparks and Frank Dixon. The Mobile Municipal Archives has the three invaluable newsletters of the Mobile Air Service Command, Brookley Bay Breeze, A la Moad, and the Welfarer, and the "History of the Mobile Air Service Command," an official unpublished study by Ralph Dennis Metzger. The

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Riveting and Rationing in Dixie: Alabama Women and the Second World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 Home Fronts: the Nation and Alabama 4
  • Chapter 2 the Recruitment and Training of Women 21
  • Chapter 3 Women as Defense Workers 36
  • Chapter 4 Adjusting to Women Workers 63
  • Chapter 5 Women and Volunteer Activities 81
  • Chapter 6 Housewives During Wartime 99
  • Conclusion 112
  • Notes 122
  • Essay On 137
  • Index 141
  • About the Author 146
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