The Comedy of the Fantastic: Ecological Perspectives on the Fantasy Novel

By Don D. Elgin | Go to book overview

2
J. R. R. TOLKIEN

When J. R. R. Tolkien Lord of the Rings first appeared in 1954 and 1955, it set the stage for the phenomenal growth of interest in the fantasy tradition. There had been interest previously, of course. Followers of epic and heroic fantasy had read the works of William Morris, Lord Dunsany, and E. R. Eddison, and many Christian readers had been charmed by the supernatural thrillers of Charles Williams and the religious allegories of C. S. Lewis, but fantasy had never commanded the attention of a truly broad public. Lord of the Rings changed that. With critical reactions ranging from Edmund Wilson's description of the work as "juvenile trash" to C. S. Lewis's contention that it was a book "good beyond hope" and with the kind of popularity indicated by the fact that the Ballantine edition went through twenty- three printings between October 1965 and March 1970, Lord of the Rings introduced fantasy to the general public in unmistakable fashion. Tolkien calendars, shirts, posters, and clubs appeared, but along with these fads were also growing numbers of critical studies which began to make clearer the undeniably rich fabric from which the novels were woven. Thus, while it would be a mistake to claim that the fantasy tradition began with Tolkien, it would be accurate to say that Tolkien's was the first fantasy work to become so popular that it could spark a growth of interest in the history of the fantasy tradition as well as serve as a springboard and model for the large numbers of fantasy writers which were to follow.

The reasons for this sudden surge of interest in fantasy were numerous. First, the ground had been prepared by the works of Morris, Dunsany, Eddison, Williams, Lewis, and others. Second, Tolkien's work,

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Comedy of the Fantastic: Ecological Perspectives on the Fantasy Novel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Prologue 1
  • 1 - Literary Fantasy and Ecological Comedy 3
  • Conclusions 27
  • 2 - J. R. R. Tolkien 31
  • 3 - C. S. Lewis 60
  • Conclusion 96
  • 4 - Charles Williams 97
  • Conclusion 124
  • 5 - Frank Herbert 125
  • Conclusion 151
  • 6 - Joy Chant 153
  • Conclusion 176
  • 7 - Conclusion 178
  • Notes 187
  • Works Consulted 193
  • Index 197
  • About the Author 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.