room, where he sat down, and covered his face with his hands sobbing in a way that nearly broke me down to see.

I went back to the room, and found Van Helsing looking at poor Lucy, and his face was sterner than ever. Some change had come over her body. Death had given back part of her beauty, for her brow and cheeks had recovered some of their flowing lines; even the lips had lost their deadly pallor. It was as if the blood, no longer needed for the working of the heart, had gone to make the harshness of death as little rude as might be.

'We thought her dying whilst she slept And sleeping when she died.'

I stood beside Van Helsing, and said:--

'Ah well, poor girl, there is peace for her at last. It is the end!'

He turned to me, and said with grave solemnity:--

'Not so! alas! not so. It is only the beginning!'

When I asked him what he meant, he only shook his head and answered:--

'We can do nothing as yet. Wait and see.'


CHAPTER XIII
DR SEWARD'S DIARY (continued)

The funeral was arranged for the next succeeding day, so that Lucy and her mother might be buried together. I attended to all the ghastly formalities, and the urbane undertaker proved that his staff were staff were afflicted -- or blessed -- with something of his own obsequious suavity. Even the woman who performed the last offices for the dead remarked to me, in a confidential, brother-professional way, when she had come out from the death-chamber: --

'She makes a very beautiful corpse, sir. It's quite a privilege to attend on her. It's not too much to say that she will do credit to our establishment!'

I noticed that Van Helsing never kept far away. This was

-162-

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