9

He was in Town Hall the following morning, probably the last place on earth he wanted to be. He had no wish to see the mayor this time. Not yet anyway. He walked up to the third floor, nervously approached room 311. "Records" read the sign on the door.

A middle-aged woman looked up from her computer, eyes squinting over glasses. She took her time before recognition, until finally convinced it was he, she said, "Young Cagle."

"Ms. Faye," he nodded, politely reading her name on the ID plate on her desk in front of her.

The purchase of the land for the Black Jack Field, he said. Might he see records of it?

"The deed," she corrected him.

She went to the appropriate file with the precision of a trained nurse in surgery. Inside of a minute she had a photocopy of the deed before him. The Gandee Commission (designated to create and construct the Black Jack Field) purchased twenty-six acres on Carson Road from the Realty Company of Helena Troy, Overton, Missouri, dated January 14, 1995.The price was $155,000. No mention of the Carson Paint Company.

"Is there anything else, Mr. Cagle?"

He looked up, grateful that she was not harassing him. She was, in fact, merely anticipating his needs.

"I thought this piece of land belonged to the Carson Paint Company," he said.

-71-

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Table of contents

  • Other Books in the Writing Baseball Series ii
  • Title Page v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 1
  • 2 20
  • 3 33
  • 4 40
  • 5 48
  • 6 51
  • 7 59
  • 8 64
  • 9 71
  • 10 77
  • 11 83
  • 12 88
  • 13 92
  • 14 99
  • 15 105
  • 16 114
  • 17 119
  • 18 128
  • 19 135
  • 20 139
  • 21 143
  • 22 145
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