Reading, Writing & Race: The Desegregation of the Charlotte Schools

By Davison M. Douglas | Go to book overview

[In admitting a few black students to white schools,] the Charlotte City School Board has acted to preserve the schools. It has acted to prevent massive, court-decreed integration.

-- Charlotte News, July 1957


CHAPTER 3
A Moderate Southern City Responds to Brown The Token Integration of the Charlotte Schools

As North Carolina nurtured an image of racial moderation, so did Charlotte. Although by the time of the Brown decision in 1954, Charlotte was one of the most racially segregated cities in the United States, during the late 1950s the city captured national acclaim for the token integration of a few of its schools. This early desegregation resulted from a mixture of motives: a moral disquiet with some of the harsher aspects of segregation and an understanding that voluntary, controlled integration could help the city retain a healthy business climate while avoiding unwanted judicial intrusion. Charlotte's business and political leaders understood, as leaders in many other southern cities did not, that token integration would well serve a range of civic interests.

Since the nineteenth century, Charlotte has thrived as one of the major economic centers of North Carolina and, more recently, the South. Charlotte's growth in the early nineteenth century was due in large measure to its close proximity to the leading gold-mining area in the United States. 1 Although the importance of gold mining to the region's economy declined with the discovery of gold in California in the mid-nineteenth century, the linkage of Charlotte with the region's growing network of railroads during the 1850s and 1860s facilitated Charlotte's eventual development as an important distribution center. 2 By 1880, Charlotte was the third- largest town in North Carolina, behind Wilmington and Raleigh; by the

-50-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reading, Writing & Race: The Desegregation of the Charlotte Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.