Chapter 14
Politics and Parties

IT IS perhaps not fanciful to trace in modern Indian political thought three main elements, which have come down from particular historical phases. First, there is the readiness to accept control and regulation as part of the normal pattern of life, which may reasonably be connected with the traditional authoritarianism of the Hindu and Muslim periods; secondly, there is an impatience to advance at an impracticable tempo, which springs naturally from the sense of time lost under alien rule; while, thirdly, the almost superstitious regard for Parliamentary forms and for the rule of law is clearly the result of the injection of British ideas of freedom and democracy into the Indian system.

These historical causes have generated certain motive forces which, in varying degrees, operate in all the political parties of India to-day. The most important of these forces is a passionate devotion to new-found independence. Englishmen of the old school revisiting India after some years are apt to be misled by the nostalgic remarks of old friends and colleagues--and still more by their contacts with old servants--into believing that large sections of the Indian public 'wish the British could come back'. Nothing could be further from the truth. Pride in Indian independence is universal and the determination to maintain it against all encroachments, real or imaginary, is common to all parties and all classes.

The second motive force in Indian politics is the belief in what Nehru has called neutralism. This will be discussed in detail later and here it need only be said that all the main Indian parties are agreed that India can and must be kept out of the next world war. They suspect all treaties and alliances and look with particular disfavour on those pacts which seem to bring the struggle between the West and the Communist countries nearer to South Asia.

Thirdly, there is the belief of the great majority of educated Indians in democratic forms of Government. Their interpreta-

-132-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern India
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.