Weather and the Ocean of Air

By William Holmes Wenstrom | Go to book overview

Chapter XV
EARTH'S HIGHEST FRONTIER -- AEROLOGYS FUTURE

Better -- Instruments and Observations -- Completer Analysis and Forecasting -- High-Pilots and Ray-Pilots -- Rising Radio Robots -- Searchlight Soundings -- Rockets to the Fore -- The Empyrean

THE future of any science can always be painted, what with the exponential rate of most human progress, as a brilliant picture in the most glowing colors. Of course this is particularly true of the great science of aerology, for its spacious laboratory, measurably colossal and immeasurably complicated, is the whole broad air blanket that is the Earth's atmosphere.

Any worker in the field of aerology comes across many factors of aerological equipment, technique, and procedure that are quite apparently in need of considerable improvement. To each intelligent and thoughtful worker there occur many possible solutions -- 'inventions,' if you like -- only a few of which he will ever have time to try out in actuality. What are the things that need improving in present-day aerology? What are the inventions, of equipment or method, that loom on the horizon of this, Earth's highest frontier?


Better Instruments and Observations

The most common aerological instruments are those devoted to measuring atmospheric pressure, temperature, and humidity. As to barometers, little if any future improvement over the present delicate and efficient instruments can be expected, and various difficulties combine to make any further advances along

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