U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

MAINE

Calais -- Ellsworth -- Bangor -- Belfast -- Brunswick -- Portland -- N.H. Line, 341.4 m. US 1.

Bangor & Aroostook R.R. parallels route between Bangor and Searsport; Maine Central R.R. between Calais, Bangor, and Bucksport and between Rockland and Portland; and Boston & Maine R.R. between Portland and Portsmouth.

Hard-surfaced roadbed, three lanes wide between Portland and Portsmouth. Accommodations principally in cities.

US 1 in Maine runs close to the coast from one end of the State to the other. It runs through resort areas, rolling and rocky farmlands, and along the banks of broad rivers; it crosses high hills -- locally called mountains -- and blueberry plains. It connects the two ends of the 2,500-mile coast line, which are but 225 miles apart by air line. The southern part of the route is more frequented, but the whole of the broken and jagged coast has a picturesque charm that makes it a favorite with summer travelers. South of Maine, land and sea have few rigid boundaries; the waves encroach and retreat, the land is washed away and built up. But on the Maine shore they meet abruptly; that old devil sea at times comes dashing in as though it had been gathering force halfway around the earth to break the stubborn, granite headlands; it attacks with a roar, retreats, and returns to attack again.

There are two coasts of Maine. The coast known to most visitors has spruce-tipped hills and hard beaches dappled with the red, orange, green, blue, and white raiment of visitors, blue-green waters broken by tilting sails and the wakes of speeding motorboats, and a brilliant blue sky. The inhabitants of this land work night and day running hotels, boarding houses, tourist camps, and lunch stands, piloting fishing and sightseeing boats, trying in a brief season to earn the money for house repairs, heavy shoes and overcoats, medicines, school books, and other 12-month needs.

The second coast of Maine is for four or five months muffled in snow; travel is at times difficult and most hotels and many of the rooms in homes are closed. But this Maine has its own charm. The rural inhabitants, even though striving to add to their limited incomes, have time to relax and they accept the comparatively few visitors as members of their families, telling them long stories of

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U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
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