U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

CONNECTICUT

R.I. Line -- New London -- New Haven -- Greenwich -- N.Y.

Line, 119 m. US 1.

New York, New Haven, & Hartford R.R. parallels the route. Four-lane cement roadbed over major part of route. Excellent accommodations of all types at frequent intervals.


Section 8. Rhode Island Line to New Haven, 71.2 m.

The first post rider on the American Continent was dispatched over this route, from New York to Boston, following the old Pequot Path, then only a blazed trail through the wilderness. Over this route in 1773 Paul Revere, spurring his foam-flecked horse, dashed on his way to Philadelphia with news of the Boston Tea Party. When the half-frozen horseman paused at Guilford to bait his horse, the astonished natives gaped wide-eyed at the streaks of war paint on his face. Today this highway, the Roaring Road, modern and efficiently policed, is the only direct route across southern Connecticut from border to border. A section of the chief vehicular highway through the North Atlantic States, it is the most heavily traveled road between New York and the cities of the New England seaboard. Although this route parallels the shore, it bypasses many of the picturesque coastal villages, and permits but occasional views of Long Island Sound.

US1 crosses the Pawcatuck River, 0 m., which separates Westerly, R.I., from the village of PAWCATUCK, in the Town of Stonington, Conn.

WEQUETEQUOCK (Ind., head of a tidal river), 2.5 m. (Town of Stonington), is a village on the long flat inlet known as Wequetequock River.

Left from Wequetequock, at an irregular crossroad opposite the small 19th century meeting house, on a dirt road that leads across Wequetequock Cove and branches sharply R. past an old GRAVEYARD, 0.1 m., the earliest in the town of Stonington; here are "wolf stones," the heavy slabs of rude stone that were laid over graves in primitive settlements as protection against the bold and numerous wolves that then roamed the countryside. The oldest stone is dated 1690.

At 5.3 m. (L) is STONINGTON (Stonington Town 11,025 pop.), a quiet old town of modest, shady streets on a narrow, rocky point. Off the Boston Post Road, quite by itself on a long point that

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.