U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

PENNSYLVANIA

N.J. Line -- Morrisville -- Philadelphia -- Swarthmore -- Kennett Square -- Md. Line, 83.5 m. US 1.

Reading R.R. parallels the route between Morrisville and Philadelphia; Pennsylvania R.R. parallels the entire route.

Well-paved, all-weather route. Accommodations at short intervals; hotels in cities.


Section 12. New Jersey Line to Maryland Line, 83.5. m.

Between the western bank of the Delaware River and the Maryland Line, US 1 pursues a southwesterly course across the undulating terrain of Bucks County, through the city of Philadelphia, and over the section of the highway known as the Baltimore Pike.

The highway crosses the Delaware River on the TRENTONMORRISVILLE BRIDGE, at a point where in 1804 the first bridge across the Delaware was built.

Bucks County was established in 1682 by William Penn as one of the three original counties. The rolling surface and fertile soil of the county are adapted to agriculture, the chief occupation of the inhabitants; small farms predominate.

MORRISVILLE, 0.6 m. (21 alt., 5,368 pop.), incorporated in 1804, was named in honor of Robert Morris, "financier of the American Revolution" and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Prior to this time it had been known as the Falls of the Delaware. Morris maintained an imposing mansion and stables, patterned after the English stables of the period, on a 2,800-acre tract here. Jean Victor Maria Moreau, one of Napoleon's marshals, who fell into disfavor, lived in the mansion during his exile. In 1915 the tract was subdivided and modern dwellings were built upon it.

The first European settlement in the county was made by the Dutch West India Company on a small island near the western bank of the Delaware, below the falls. Three or four families lived around the company's trading post there from 1624 to 1627. Nothing remains of the island except a large sand bar, nearly opposite Morrisville. A ferry operated here more than 50 years before Penn's arrival in America.

Morrisville was seriously considered by Congress as a site for the permanent capital of the United States, when, on October 7, 1783, a

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.