U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

SOUTH CAROLINA

N.C. Line -- Cheraw -- Camden -- Columbia -- Aiken -- Ga. Line, 171 m. US 1.

The highway between Cheraw and Columbia is paralleled by the Seaboard Air Line Ry., and between Columbia and Batesburg by the Southern Ry. Route paved throughout.

Accommodations of all kinds available at short intervals, with hotels chiefly in cities.


Section 19. North Carolina Line to Columbia, 96 m.

US 1 traverses the central section of South Carolina, an area of deep sandy ridges with sparse and stunted vegetation. Short-leaf pine and blackjack oak are the chief trees. For years this was the most poverty-stricken section of the State, redeemed only by the fall-line cities and the few towns that were settled mainly as resorts. Now many acres are devoted to profitable orchards and fruit farms.

The highway crosses the Big Pee Dee River, passing through an old covered bridge, the only one on US 1. Each piece of wood was cut and numbered, its place being determined in advance of the building. During the extreme high water of the spring floods the bridge is impassable.

CHERAW (Ind., fire town or place of the tall grass,) 10 m. (145 alt., 3,575 pop.), was settled by Welsh emigrants from Pennsylvania in 1735. The town was carefully planned and remains beautiful today. Its distinctive charm is created by its division into large blocks with broad streets. Each street is planted with four rows of shade trees.

The large number of trees in Cheraw is owing to an old town law that required anyone seen intoxicated on the street to go to the woods, bring back a tree, and plant it.

The first white settlers in the area made their homes at the head of navigation on the Big Pee Dee River. The land they occupied formerly belonged to the Cheraw Indians, hence the name of the town. When upper South Carolina was divided into districts, the section in which the town was situated became the District of the Old Cheraws.

The term "lynch law" is said to have originated at Cheraw during Revolutionary times ( see also Louisburg, N.C.). Col. Charles Lynch of Lynchburg, Va., had been named Judge Advocate to serve at courtsmartial for Gen. Nathanael Greene, whose camp was nearby. So

-231-

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U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
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