U. S. One, Maine to Florida

By Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration | Go to book overview

FLORIDA

Ga. Line -- Jacksonville -- New Smyrna -- Fort Pierce -- West Palm Beach -- Miami -- Key West, 568 m. US 1, US 1-Alt., and State 4.

Florida East Coast Ry. between. Ga. Line and Florida City and Atlantic Coast Line R.R. between Ga. Line and Miami parallel route. Hard surfaced; few curves. Cattle a hazard, especially at night. Dangerous railroad crossings near Jacksonville. Accommodations of all kinds, chiefly in cities.


Section 22. Georgia Line to Jacksonville, 37.9 m.

Between the St. Mary's River and Jacksonville US 1 passes over the eastern edge of the Trail Ridge, the watershed of the peninsula, for approximately eight miles. From here the Ridge section slopes into the flat woods area of northeast Florida. Few people live in this section of the State, and except in the three small towns, few houses are seen along the route. There are dense hammock lands along the river at the northern end of the route, and evergreen pinelands border the highway.

From the white concrete bridge spanning the ST. MARY's RIVER, 0 m., an excellent view is afforded of the deep narrow stream and its wooded banks. All types of bay vegetation grow along the water's edge, the sweet and black gum, magnolia, swamp holly, poplar, several varieties of oak, elm, ash, willow, cedar, and some slash pine., Bamboo vine, yellow jessamine, Virginia creeper, and wild grape enmesh the trees and cling to some of the shrubs and underbrush. Here mistletoe is found clinging to the black gum, and palmettos grow in profusion. Prickly ash, elbow, and hurrah bushes are common. Flood tides have cut deeply into the, high banks of the river and many of the trees droop precariously over the water.

Usually the St. Mary's is a peaceful little stream exhibiting temperament only in swirls and eddies as it twists and turns through the semitropical forest; but after a period of rains the river becomes a raging torrent lashing at the trees and shrubs along its banks. During these times the normal depth of eight ft. at the bridge increases to 18 or 20 ft.

The drab coffee-colored water was formerly in demand by the masters of four-riggers and tramp steamers docking at Fernandina,

-252-

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U. S. One, Maine to Florida
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Notes on Use of Book ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Special Foods from Maine to Florida xvii
  • Maine xix
  • Maine 1
  • New Hampshire 47
  • Massachusetts 55
  • Rhode Island 65
  • Connecticut 89
  • New York 114
  • New Jersey 124
  • Pennsylvania 135
  • Maryland 151
  • District of Columbia 184
  • Virginia 185
  • North Carolina 210
  • South Carolina 231
  • Georgia 240
  • Florida 252
  • Side Route 1 296
  • Annual Events Along Us 1 311
  • Index 323
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