The Aymara Language in Its Social and Cultural Context: A Collection Essays on Aspects of Aymara Language and Culture

By M. J. Hardman | Go to book overview

13. Data Source in La Paz Spanish Verb Tenses
(from "Cultures in Contact") E. Herminia MartinIn the Spanish of La Paz. Bolivia, as is the case in Aymara, it is relevant whether knowledge of the facts is direct or indirect. However, from what we know ( Lucy Sanchez et al., personal communication), the distinction applies only to the past; thus the preterite is used to indicate direct knowledge:
Hoy día llegó su mamá de él.
'Today his mother arrived, (and I saw her arrive).'
The pluperfect is used to indicate indirect knowledge:
Hoy día había llegado su mamá de él.
'Today his mother arrived (but I didn't see her arrive).'

The comparison of the three structures shows that the time category of Paceño Spanish does not coincide exactly either with Aymara or with the Spanish of Buenos Aires; it does coincide with Aymara in marking the relevance of direct versus indirect knowledge (see fig. 13.1).

____________________
Herminia Martin, professor of Spanish in Buenos Aires, was involved in Aymara language research under the auspices of INEL in Bolivia beginning in 1966. Because of her background in Spanish linguistics and her famillarity with Ay mara, she was in a unique position to make comments concerning Spanish dialect comparisons. Many of these she shared with the students in INEL and was lect to confirm and make more explicit matters that the rest of us had noted on an anecdotal level. Some of these she wrote up in a paper entitled "Culturas en Contrato," presented in Lima in 1975 for the annual meeting of PILEI (Programa Interamericana de Linguística y Enseñanza de Idiomas). Not all of the paper is

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