Readings on the Relation of Government to Property and Industry

By Samuel P. Orth | Go to book overview
assets. The facts must not be juggled in such a manner as to cause confusion. The company must be forced to tell the truth from beginning to end. We cannot longer tolerate annual reports to the secretary of state which consist of four or five general statements. Such action upon the part of the state will not inspire confidence in corporate enterprises. Many of the malpractices, so general and widespread at the present moment, must be done away with. It is never good policy to deprive the states of power, but in the matter of incorporating business enterprises the state cannot act freely and independently. This power, therefore, must be delegated to the national government, for, if several states enact good, fair and just laws, other states may place barriers of such a nature that it will be impossible for the corporation, organized under these fair laws, to do business in the obstinate state or states. For the benefit of the people as a whole the states must be deprived of the right to grant charters. Such an act will rid the country of bandits and freebooters and insure stability in financial circles. "No fact of industry is more obvious than that modern business has outgrown and wholly disregards state lines, and that the jurisdiction of a single state as applied to the operations of a great interstate business, are futile and even harmful." Corporations are destined, in many instances, to go beyond the proper supervision and control of the state which gave them existence. The best of state laws will never do away with the present abuses. Congress alone can, with safety, provide a method by which reasonable combination may be permitted. The relative merits of a federal license or a national incorporation law are beyond question.

UNIFORM FOREIGN CORPORATION LAWS1

BY FRANKLIN A. WAGNER OF THE NEW YORK BAR

(A Paper Read at the Fifteenth Annual Convention of the Commercial Law League, at Narragansett Pier, on July 20, 1909)

The growth of new and diverse legislation in the various States has become a positive burden to all who are called upon to acquire a comparative knowledge of the statutes.

The introduction of bills, often for "home consumption" only, has surfeited our Legislatures, and unless protected by a self-reliant governor who has the courage to wield his veto powers, the result of each legislative session is the addition of one or two volumes of session laws to the lawyer's library.

Multiply this output by forty-six times the number of legislative

____________________
1
Reprinted from the New York Law Journal, July 27, 1909.

-184-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Readings on the Relation of Government to Property and Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 666

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.