Recollections of Three Reigns

By Colin Welch; Frederick Ponsonby | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
The King's visits to Germany -- Kiel, 1904 -- Orders and decorations -- Hamburg -- Homburg, 1906 -- Kassel, 1907

NOT least of those who were irritated at King Edward's apparent preference for France was the German Emperor. To him Berlin was the centre of the earth, but here was King Edward visiting France, Portugal, Italy, and Austria, and absolutely ignoring Germany. The difficulty was that the bad feeling between the two countries hardly admitted of a visit to Berlin. However, King Edward decided that a friendly visit to the Emperor at Kiel might do some good, and accordingly went there in June 1904.

The party on the Royal yacht was an odd mixture. There was Baron D'Estournelles de Constant, a French pacifist known in France as 'L'ange de la Paix', who had written articles on disarmament in every European magazine, but who had a certain reverence for monarchs generally. The Emperor treated him as an amiable lunatic, but King Edward liked to hear him expound his theories, without apparently taking them very seriously.

Then there was the Prince of Monaco, a scientifically-minded man who cared only for deep-sea fishing, but who seemed to get on very well with the Emperor. Why these two were included in the party it is difficult to say. Possibly D'Estournelles was asked to please the French and provide antidote to the German poison, while the Prince of Monaco might be useful as a smoke-screen. Prince Louis of Battenberg, a popular Admiral in the English Navy, who was a great friend of King Edward, Lord Selborne, First Lord of the Admiralty as Minister in Attendance, Sir Frank Lascelles, the British Ambassador in Berlin, Major-General Grierson, 1 who had been Military Attaché, Captain O'Callaghan, 2 a leading light in the Navy, Captain Tyrwhitt3 and Captain Troubridge, 4 reputed to be coming men, Captain Allenby, 5 Naval Attaché in Berlin, Count Gleichen, Military Attaché in Berlin, Lord Ormonde, 6 the Commodore of the Yacht Squadron, Chevalier de Martino, the marine painter, Lord Churchill, 7 Lord-in-Waiting, Johnny

____________________
1
Later Sir James Grierson.
2
Later Admiral. Naval A.D.C. to the King.
3
Later Admiral of the Fleet Sir Reginald Tyrwhitt; commanded Destroyer Flotillas at Heligoland Bight and Dogger Bank.
4
Later Admiral Sir Ernest Troubridge.
5
Later Admiral Reginald Allenby.
6
James Butler, 3rd Marquess of Ormonde.
7
Victor Spencer, 1st Viscount Churchill of Wychwood.

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Recollections of Three Reigns
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.