Recollections of Three Reigns

By Colin Welch; Frederick Ponsonby | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
Marienbad -- The King incognito -- Visit to the Austrian Emperor -- Ferdinand of Bulgaria -- John Burns -- Golf at Marienbad -- Clemenceau -- Bosnia and Herzegovina

POSSIBLY there was no part of the year the King enjoyed more than his annual cure at Marienbad where, after a few preliminary difficulties over his incognito, he enjoyed the informality and lack of restraint of the Continental spa.

In August 1903 the King went to Marienbad attended by Stanley Clarke and myself. Sidney Greville came out with us as he happened to be taking the waters there, but he went to another hotel.

At Frankfort we stopped for a short time where the German Emperor stage-managed a greeting. There was a guard of honour and he was surrounded by innumerable officers and officials in uniform.

As the King was incognito he travelled under the name of the Duke of Lancaster, but Mr. Fehr, the courier, had made a mistake and had had the labels printed Lord Lancaster. The King was furious and said people would think he was an ennobled gunmaker. One amusing incident occurred with this name; Professor Ray Lahkester1 came to Marienbad to take the waters, and as the inhabitants had begun to associate the name Lancaster with the Royal Family, they came to the conclusion he was a Prince travelling incognito.

The suite of rooms at the Hotel Weimar taken by the King were very comfortable, and his own bedroom, dining-room, and sitting-room were specially furnished. All the furniture and pictures were sold after he left each year for double their value, but I never had the slightest wish to buy any of them.

There were about four thousand people in Marienbad taking the cure, mostly Austrians with a number of bearded and ringleted Polish Jews, who wore a curious old-fashioned top-hat, a long black coat, and high boots. The majority of the water-drinkers were very fat: in fact, I had never seen so many fat people before. We walked down from the hotel at seven o'clock and it was quite disgraceful the way in which they mobbed the King. Wherever we walked we were followed by a dense crowd of several hundreds, and when the King sat down they formed a circle round him and took snapshots. He was very angry and said if this continued it would be impossible for him to stay there. The mistake was that the Burgomaster had put up

____________________
1
The natural historian and biologist.

-228-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Recollections of Three Reigns
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 370

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.