Medieval Merchant Venturers: Collected Studies

By E. M. Carus-Wilson | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE essays here collected are reproduced virtually in their original form; a few misprints and errors of detail have been corrected and a few statements slightly modified, but beyond this no attempt has been made to incorporate the results of later research or to amend what is amiss. Many records consulted in manuscript are now available in print, as for instance the Southampton Brokage Book of 1439-40, 1 the Great Red Book of Bristol, 2 and the first volume of the Mercers' Acts of Court,3 while a number of customs accounts and miscellaneous documents illustrating Bristol's trade have been brought together in The Overseas Trade of Bristol in the Later Middle Ages. 4 References to such records have, however, been left unchanged, since they can easily be followed up, if desired, in the published volumes.

It is a pleasant duty to acknowledge the kindness of the many owners and custodians of manuscripts who have allowed me to consult records in their keeping and have made my researches both easy and agreeable. Thanks are due in particular to the Town Clerks and Archivists of Bristol, Gloucester, Southampton, Exeter, Hull, Beverley, Lynn, Yarmouth, Norwich, Ipswich, Leicester and elsewhere; to the Rector of Christ Church with St. Ewen's and to the Vicar of St. Nicholas at Bristol; to Miss Fox of Yate House; to the officers of the Mercers' Company, the Skinners' Company, and the Ironmongers' Company; to Mr. A. H. Thomas, late Deputy-Keeper of the Records of the City of London; and to Mr. V. B. Redstone who generously allowed me to consult his transcripts of various

____________________
1
The Brokage Book of Southampton, 1439-40, ed. Barbara M. Bunyard ( Southampton Record Society Publications, 40, 1941).
2
The Great Red Book of Bristol, ed. E. W. W. Veale ( Bristol Record Society Publications, II, IV, VIII, XVI, XVIII, 1931, 1933, 1937, 1950, 1953).
3
Acts of Court of the Mercers' Company, 1453-1527, ed. L. Lyell and F. D. Watney ( Cambridge, 1936).
4
The Overseas Trade of Bristol in the Later Middle Ages, ed. E. M. Carus-Wilson ( Bristol Record Society Publications, VII, 1936).

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Medieval Merchant Venturers: Collected Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.