If I Forget Thee, O Jerusalem: American Jews and the State of Israel

By Robert Silverberg | Go to book overview

Six Days in June

ON MONDAY morning, June 5,1967, I was awakened as usual by the sound of my radio-clock, automatically turning itself on to deliver the 8 A.M. news. The news that morning was grim. "War has broken out in the Near East," the announcer said. "Aircraft of Egypt, Jordan, Syria, and Iraq have bombed Israel. Radio Cairo reports that Tel Aviv is in flames and an oil refinery near Haifa has been destroyed. Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, the Sudan, Kuwait, Yemen, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia have announced declarations of war against Israel. There has been no word as yet from the Israeli government on conditions there."

Scarcely awake yet, I felt a sudden chill of terror. It's happened at last, I thought. Pearl Harbor Day once more, this time for Israel. I pictured waves of Arab planes streaking in from the Mediterranean or from the desert and smashing, in a few hours, what had taken so long to build. I saw the Russian-built tanks of Egypt rolling through the shattered streets of Tel Aviv. I saw the troops of Jordan bursting across no man's land into sleek Jewish Jerusalem. I saw Syrian infantrymen descending like locusts on the little farming settlements of the Galilee. And I felt a sense of personal anguish and loss, as though the enemy were marching up my own street toward the comfortable house where I lay still abed.

Even in that moment of fear and despair, I paused to wonder at my own presumptuousness. By what right did I allow myself the luxury of these emotions? What, after all, did Israel mean to me, that I should be so deeply concerned? Some friends of mine lived there, but no close relatives. Up to that time I had never visited the place, never contributed a penny toward its develop-

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
If I Forget Thee, O Jerusalem: American Jews and the State of Israel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Six Days in June 1
  • One - The Dream of Herzl 11
  • Two - Zion in the New World 42
  • Three - Toward the Balfour Declaration 69
  • Four - A Troubled Mandate 100
  • Five - Toward the White Paper 133
  • Six - Zionism at War 175
  • Seven - Agitation and Agony 253
  • Eight - The Making of a State 337
  • Nine - Medinat Yisrael 406
  • Ten - The Unending War 497
  • List of Jewish Organizations in the United States 593
  • Acknowledgments 597
  • Bibliography 599
  • Index 605
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 626

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.