Berlin Calling: American Broadcasters in Service to the Third Reich

By John Carver Edwards | Go to book overview

3
Max Otto Koischwitz, Alias Mr. O.K.

Months after the guns of World War II went silent and the transmissions of Radio Berlin had ceased, charged memories remained in the United States of those turncoat Americans who carried Hitler's argument over the airways. To be sure, the U.S.A. Zone's audience was always small and those who tuned in did so mainly for the purpose of amusement rather than inspiration; the broadcasts of Max Otto Koischwitz, alias Dr. Anders, alias "Mr. O.K.," discoursed with professional authority on such topics as literature, music, drama, philosophy, and geopolitics. His appeal was directed to America's college youth and the highly literate German-Americans who, his superiors believed, might be susceptible to the views of national socialism.

Born on February 19, 1902, in the small Silesian hamlet of Jauer, this son of a prominent physician spent much of his time in the nearby mountains he grew to love so much. Books were the boy's passion as well, and this combination of dedicated study and solitary retreats into the nearby hills inculcated in young Otto a penchant for mysticism and metaphysical thought rare for his tender years. Patriotism and hero worship were also key ingredients in Otto's character. How he admired those renowned warriors and philosophers who had borne the Fatherland's arms and had defined the German psyche. His grandfather fought against France in the Franco-Prussian War; his great-grandfather, against Napoleon; his own father and brothers would serve the Kaiser and the Third Reich respectively. 1

Koischwitz's intellectual precocity saw him through the College de Royal Française in 1920 and the University of Berlin four years later at the ripe

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Berlin Calling: American Broadcasters in Service to the Third Reich
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - The Beginnings of the U.S.A. Zone and Its Pioneer American Broadcasters 1
  • 2 - Jane Anderson, Alias the Georgia Peach 41
  • 3 - Max Otto Koischwitz, Alias Mr. O.K. 57
  • 4 - Robert H. Best, Alias Mr. Guess Who 99
  • 5 - Douglas Chandler, Alias Paul Revere 115
  • 6 - Donald Day, Goebbels' Final Recruit 149
  • Epilogue 187
  • Notes 193
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 231
  • About the Author *
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