Urban Planning in a Multicultural Society

By Michael A. Burayidi | Go to book overview
the University of Maryland since 1993, The purpose of the grant is described in detail in a later section of the paper.
8.
This is a function of the nature of the courses. The primary purpose of the courses is to introduce the "principles of urban design" to students. Thus, many of the readings are on these principles (among others, I employ such classic readings as Alexander, Ishikawa, and Silverstein 1977; Broadbent 1990; Lynch 1960, 1981; Trancik 1986).
9.
Note that there was some flexibility in the assignment. The students were told that they did not have to write the essay keeping all the above-mentioned backgrounds in mind. For example, they could just write the essay from their educational background.
10.
Until this year ( Spring 1997) there had been four Regional Institutes and a National Institute. For the academic year 1996-97, the Southern Institute was combined with the Northeastern Institute. Hence, I could expose students to some southern cities also.
11.
The seeds of the program were sown in the Urban Studies Institute in 1963. The Center for Urban Affairs came into existence in 1970 and the M.A. in Urban Planning and Policy Analysis was initiated. The program became the first planning program at an HBCU to get degree recognition -- the forerunner of the accreditation process -- from American Institute of Planners (AIP) in 1974. In 1975 the name of the degree was changed to Master of City and Regional Planning (MCRP). The program was first accredited by Planning Accreditation Board (PAB) in 1986. For a detailed discussion on the history of the program, see Sen ( 1997).
12.
Morgan's history began in 1867 and can be characterized into four periods. Like most HBCUs, the first period ( 1867-90) consisted of an institution -- the Centenary Biblical Institute -- set up by missionaries for the sole mission of training African American men for the Methodist Ministry. Morgan College ( 1890-1939), the second period, saw a broadening of the mission to educate men and women for careers other than ministry. With the changing of the name to Morgan College, the primaiy mission was to prepare African Americans of good moral standing for careers in public school teaching. Morgan State College ( 1939-75) is the third period in the institute's evolution. It was created in 1939, when the institute was purchased from the Methodist Episcopal Church by the State of Maryland. Morgan's mission expanded from teacher training to a balanced liberal arts education in this epoch. The fourth period of the institute began in 1975, when Maryland General Assembly granted university status to Morgan. For a detailed discussion on the history of the University, see Sen ( 1997). For a good discussion on the evolution of HBCUs, see Roebuck and Murty ( 1993).

REFERENCES

Alexander C., S. Ishikawa, and M. Silverstein. A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction. New York: Oxford University Press. 1977.

Amirahmadi H. Globalization and Planning Education. Environment and Planning B, vol. 20, 1993:537-55.

Andrews J. H. The Newest Americans. Planning, vol. 63, 1997:4-9.

Banerjee T. Environmental Design in the Developing World: Some Thoughts on Design Education. Journal of Planning Education and Research, vol. 5, 1985:28-38.

Banerjee T. Third World City Design: Values, Models and Education in B. Sanyal (ed.), Breaking Boundaries: A One World Approach to Planning Education. New York: Plenum Press. 1990:173-89.

Banks J. A. Multiethnic Education in USA: Practices and Promises in T. Corner (ed.), Education in Multicultural Societies. New York: St. Martin's Press. 1984:68-93.

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